$29.99


Great ORIGINAL Polish Poster measuring 26" x 37" featuring off beat art quite different than the American Movie Poster, printed on Kraft Paper, which is what POLISH film posters are known for, unique art and colors on Kraft Paper. This Poster has some slight edgwear, and light creases. PLEASE SEE IMAGES.

It was used to promote the GEORGE LUCAS/ RON HOWARD 1988 Adventure,

Willow

A reluctant dwarf must play a critical role in protecting a special baby from an evil queen.

A baby girl is discovered in a river by Ranon and Mims, the children of Willow Ufgood, a dwarf farmer and magician and the baby girl is taken into the care of Willow's family. But when a terrifying dog-like creature attacks Willow's village, whilst tracking down the baby. Willow consults the village council and the wizard The High Aldwin. The High Aldwin gives Willow a task and Willow leaves the village and embarks on the task to give the baby girl to a responsible person. But Willow soon learns the baby is Elora Danan, the baby girl destined to bring about the downfall of the evil sorceress Queen Bavmorda. Joined by his allies: swordsman Madmartigan, sorceress Fin Razel and the Brownies Franjean and Rool, Willow takes it upon himself to protect Elora from Queen Bavmorda, who intends to kill Elora and prevent Elora from fulfilling her destiny. And Willow and his allies are pursued by Queen Bavmorda's daughter Sorsha and the evil commander of Queen Bavmorda's army General Kael, whom ... Director: Ron Howard

Writers: George Lucas (story), Bob Dolman (screenplay)

Stars: Val Kilmer, Joanne Whalley, Warwick Davis

Cast

Val Kilmer ... Madmartigan
Joanne Whalley ... Sorsha
Warwick Davis ... Willow Ufgood
Jean Marsh ... Queen Bavmorda
Patricia Hayes ... Fin Raziel
Billy Barty ... High Aldwin
Pat Roach ... Gen. Kael
Gavan O'Herlihy ... Airk Thaughbaer
David Steinberg ... Meegosh
Phil Fondacaro ... Vohnkar
Tony Cox ... Vohnkar Warrior
Robert Gillibrand ... Vohnkar Warrior
Mark Northover ... Burglekutt
Kevin Pollak ... Rool
Rick Overton ... Franjean

Poster has an UNUSUAL image, of wooded creatures. It is different than U.S version. It's in good shape except for the edges regardless the thin kraft paper, they usually tear, it's the nature of the beast. Amazing it was saved over 30 years old!

Shop with confidence! This is part of our in-store inventory from our shop which is has been located in the heart of Hollywood where we have been in business for OVER 40 years!

MORE INFO ON VAL KILMER: Born in Los Angeles, California. Studied at Hollywood's Professional's School and, in his teens, entered Juilliard's drama program. His professional acting career began on stage, and he still participates in theater; he played Hamlet at the 1988 Colorado Shakespeare Festival. His film debut was in the 1984 spoof Top Secret! (1984), wherein he starred as blond rock idol Nick Rivers. He was in a number of films throughout the 1980s, including the 1986 smash Top Gun (1986). Despite his obvious talent and range, it wasn't until his astonishingly believable performance as Jim Morrison in Oliver Stone's The Doors (1991) that the world sat up and took notice. Kilmer again put his good baritone to use in the movie, performing all of the concert pieces. Since then, he has played two more American legends, Elvis Presley in True Romance (1993) and Doc Holliday in Tombstone (1993). In July 1994, it was announced that Kilmer would be taking over the role of Batman/Bruce Wayne from Michael Keaton.

MORE INFO ON JOHANNE WHALLEY: An arresting, dark-haired stunner of 1980s and 1990s continental filming, Joanne Whalley should have made far more of an impact in Hollywood than she did. She was born in Manchester, England and prodded by her parents into acting at an early age, performing in school plays and winning a recurring role at age 10 on the popular long-running British TV serial "Coronation Street" (1960). From there she played series characters on "Emmerdale" (1972) and "A Kind of Loving" (1982), where she became known for playing crafty, precocious girls.

After gaining significant TV status, she auditioned for and was accepted into England's Royal Court Theatre, performing classical ingénue roles in such standards as "The Three Sisters" and earning kudos, including an Olivier nomination. The doe-eyed, beauteous Joanne was a natural for film and received some attention for playing a groupie in Pink Floyd The Wall (1982). She went on to earn critical notice in second lead roles among some pretty heady company including Miranda Richardson and Rupert Everett in the stylish 50s period piece Dance with a Stranger (1985); Ray McAnally in the smart satirical comedy No Surrender (1985); and Anthony Hopkins in the bitter-edged social drama The Good Father (1985). She impressed as well on TV as Young Fan opposite George C. Scott's Ebenezer Scrooge in A Christmas Carol (1984) (TV), and in the superlative epic dramas "Reilly: Ace of Spies" (1983), "Edge of Darkness" (1985) and "The Singing Detective" (1986), earning a BAFTA nomination for "Darkness."

Joanne moved quickly up the ranks and top-lined her very first film as the protagonist in "Screen Two: Will You Love Me Tomorrow (#3.3)" (1987). She carried the movie beautifully as a young unstable woman leaving the security of an institution for the first time. She is fascination itself as her character grows increasingly disillusioned with the harsh realities of everyday life. Her next role as Sorsha was an extremely important one and the reasons are twofold. The Ron Howard directed fantasy adventure Willow (1988) became not only her first Hollywood picture, but it introduced her to leading man Val Kilmer, with whom she fell in love and married in 1988. Adjusting her own moniker to read Joanne Whalley-Kilmer, she proceeded to pair up with Kilmer playing a con artist in Kill Me Again (1989), and gave a star-making performance as tabloid-making "exotic dancer" Christine Keeler in Scandal (1989), which revisited Britain's huge government-sex scandal of the early 1960s.

Hollywood beckoned in the 1990s for the new British "bad girl" and Joanne acquiesced. She appeared opposite Hollywood's top-drawer male stars including Charlie Sheen in Navy Seals (1990) and Tom Berenger in Shattered (1991). She also won the coveted but extremely daunting role of Scarlett O'Hara in a TV sequel to Gone with the Wind (1939). "Scarlett" (1994) was an ambitious undertaking but understandably paled in originality, scope and central performances. Joanne and Timothy Dalton (as Rhett Butler) were quite admirable in their make-or-break performances but they had large shoes to fill and the drama itself drew rather lackluster reviews. While Dalton's "007" image softened any negative repercussions, Joanne's career momentum suffered. In addition, more adverse publicity occurred when her spotlight marriage to Kilmer ended in the divorce courts in 1996. They had two children: Mercedes (born 1991) and Jack (born 1995).

In later years, she played such prominent leads as Jacqueline Kennedy and Queen Mary on both film and TV, but her time had come and gone. The talent of this exceptionally beautiful woman, however, remains intact. More recently she appeared in the movie Played (2006), which also featured ex-husband Kilmer.

MORE INFO ON GEORGE LUCAS: was a stationery store owner and he had three siblings. During his late teens, he went to Downey High School and was very much interested in drag car racing. He planned to become a professional racecar driver. However, a terrible car accident just after his high school graduation ended that dream permanently. The accident changed his views on life. He decided to attend Modesto Junior College before enrolling in the University of Southern California film school. As a film student, he made several short films including THX-1138: 4EB (Electronic Labyinth) which won first prize at the 1967-68 National Student Film Festival. In 1967, he was awarded a scholarship by Warner Brothers to observe the making of Finian's Rainbow (1968) which was being directed by Francis Ford Coppola. Lucas and Coppola became good friends and formed a company called American Zoetrope in 1969. The company's first project was Lucas' full-length version of THX 1138 (1971). In 1971, Coppola went into production for The Godfather (1972), and Lucas formed his own company, Lucasfilm Ltd. In 1973, he wrote and directed the semi-autobiographical American Graffiti (1973) which won the Golden Globe and garnered five Academy Award nominations. This gave him the clout he needed for his next daring venture. From 1973 to 1974, he began writing the screenplay for Star Wars (1977). He was inspired to make this movie from Flash Gordon and the Planet of the Apes films. In 1975, he established ILM (Industrial Light and Magic) to produce the visual effects needed for the movie. Another company called Sprocket Systems was established to edit and mix Star Wars and later becomes known as Skywalker Sound. His movie was turned down by several studios until 20th Century Fox gave him a chance. Lucas agreed to forgo his directing salary in exchange for 40% of the film's box-office take and all merchandising rights. The movie went on to break all box office records and earned seven Academy Awards. It redefined the term "blockbuster". The rest is history. Lucas made the other Star Wars films and along with Steven Spielberg created the Indiana Jones series which made box office records of their own. From 1980 to 1985, Lucas was busy with the construction of Skywalker Ranch, built to accommodate the creative, technical, and administrative needs of Lucasfilm. Lucas also revolutionized movie theaters with the THX System which was created to maintain the highest quality standards in motion picture viewing. He went on to make several more movies that have created major breakthroughs in filmmaking. He is chairman of the board of The George Lucas Educational Foundation. In 1992, George Lucas was honored with the Irving G. Thalberg Award by the Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for his lifetime achievement.

MORE INFO ON RON HOWARD:

Ron was born in Oklahoma, into an acting family - his father had realized a boyhood dream of acting by attending the University of Oklahoma and majoring in drama, and his mother went through acting school in New York. He was in his first movie at 18 months, Frontier Woman (1956), although his first real part was at the age of 4. Soon a regular on "Playhouse 90" (1956), he was cast as Opie on "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960), and later moved from a child in Mayberry to America's teenager as Richie Cunningham in "Happy Days" (1974). The life of a child star is certainly not routine, but Ron's parents wanted his life to be as normal as possible - he attended public schools and at age 15 even took nine months off to play a basketball season. The transition from child actor to adult actor is always difficult, but for Ron the real transition was from child actor to adult director. There were some film roles, such as The Shootist (1976) for which he received a Golden Globe nomination, but his dream and now his focus was directing. He had begun shooting films at age 15 with a Super-8 camera, and after high school spent two years in a film program at the University of Southern California, but then left, feeling he could learn more from actual experience. That first film was the hardest to finance, but he struck a deal with Roger Corman - he would star in Eat My Dust (1976) and Corman would produce Grand Theft Auto (1977) which Howard would direct (he also wrote the script and starred). It was a success, and his directorial career was jump-started. Married since 1975 to his high school sweetheart, he, in 1997, is enjoying a life of telling stories as one of Hollywood's top directors.

This item is part of Backlot Movie Memorabilia and collectibles in-store inventory from our shop which is located in the heart of Hollywood, where we have been in business for OVER 40 years!!!

WILLOW Original POLISH Poster VAL KILMER George Lucas RON HOWARD Joanne Whalley
Item #BMM0004213