$9.99


This is an ORIGINAL 1-Sheet MOVIE POSTER from New World Pictures, measuring 27" x 41. It has small pinholes and one panel at the bottom looks like it has waviness from the back. It doesn't show on the front.

This poster was used to promote in theaters the 1978 musical film drama

AUTUMN SONATA

A married daughter who longs for her mother's love gets visited by the latter, a successful concert pianist. After having neglected her children for many years, world famous pianist Charlotte visits her daughter Eva in her home. To her surprise she finds her other daughter, Helena, there as well. Helena is mentally disabled, and Eva has taken Helena out of the institution where their mother had placed her. The tension between Charlotte and Eva only builds up slowly, until a nightly conversation releases all the things they have wanted to tell each other.

Writer and Director: Ingmar Bergman

Stars: Ingrid Bergman, Liv Ullmann, Lena Nyman

The entire cast included:

Ingrid Bergman ... Charlotte Andergast
Liv Ullmann ... Eva
Lena Nyman ... Helena
Halvar Björk ... Viktor
Marianne Aminoff ... Charlotte's private secretary
Arne Bang-Hansen ... Uncle Otto
Gunnar Björnstrand ... Paul
Erland Josephson ... Josef
Georg Løkkeberg ... Leonardo
Mimi Pollak ... Piano instructor
Linn Ullmann ... Eva as a child

It is all original 40 years old! Nice if you like this film, or its leading ladies!

Shop with confidence! This is part of our in-store inventory from our shop which is has been located in the heart of Hollywood where we have been in business for the OVER 40 years!

MORE INFO ON INGRID BERGMAN: Ingrid Bergman was born in Stockholm, Sweden, on August 29, 1915. The woman who would be one of the top stars in Hollywood in the 1940s had decided to become an actress after finishing her formal schooling. She had had a taste of acting at age 17 when she played an uncredited role of a girl standing in line in the Swedish film Landskamp (1932) in 1932 - not much of a beginning for a girl who would be known as "Sweden's illustrious gift to Hollywood." Her parents died when she was just a girl and the uncle she lived with didn't want to stand in the way of Ingrid's dream. The next year she enrolled in the Swedish Royal Theatre but decided that stage acting was not for her. It would be three more years before she would have another chance at a film. When she did, it was more than just a bit part. The film in question was Munkbrogreven (1935), where she had a speaking part as Elsa Edlund. After several films that year that established her as a class actress, Ingrid appeared in Intermezzo (1936/I) as Anita Hoffman. Luckily for her, American producer David O. Selznick saw it and sent a representative from MGM to gain rights to the story and have Ingrid signed to a contract. Once signed, she came to California and starred in MGM's 1939 remake of her 1936 film, Intermezzo: A Love Story (1939), reprising her original role. The film was a hit and so was Ingrid. Her beauty was unlike anything the movie industry had seen before and her acting was superb. Hollywood was about to find out that they had the most versatile actress the industry had ever seen. Here was a woman who truly cared about the craft she represented. The public fell in love with her. Ingrid was under contract to go back to Sweden to film En enda natt (1939) in 1939 and Juninatten (1940) in 1940. Back in the US she appeared in three films, all well-received. She made only one film in 1942, but it was the classic Casablanca (1942) opposite the great Humphrey Bogart.

Ingrid was choosing her roles well. In 1943 she was nominated for an Academy Award for her role in For Whom the Bell Tolls (1943), the only film she made that year. The critics and public didn't forget her when she made Gaslight (1944) the following year--her role of Paula Alquist got her the Oscar for Best Actress. In 1945 Ingrid played in Spellbound (1945), Saratoga Trunk (1945) and The Bells of St. Mary's (1945), for which she received her third Oscar nomination for her role of Sister Benedict. She made no films in 1947, but bounced back with a fourth nomination for Joan of Arc (1948). In 1949 she went to Italy to film Stromboli (1950), directed by Roberto Rossellini. She fell in love with him and left her husband, Dr. Peter Lindstrom, and daughter, Pia Lindstr?m. America's "moral guardians" in the press and the pulpits were outraged. She was pregnant and decided to remain in Italy, where her son was born. In 1952 Ingrid had twins, Isotta and Isabella Rossellini, who became an outstanding actress in her own right, as did Pia. Ingrid continued to make films in Italy and finally returned to Hollywood in 1956 in the title role in Anastasia (1956), which was filmed in England. For this she won her second Academy Award. She had scarcely missed a beat. Ingrid continued to bounce between Europe and the US making movies, and fine ones at that. A film with Ingrid Bergman was sure to be a quality production. In her final big-screen performance in 1978's Hostsonaten (1978) she had her final Academy Award nomination. Though she didn't win, many felt it was the most sterling performance of her career. Ingrid retired, but not before she gave an outstanding performance in the mini-series A Woman Called Golda (1982) (TV), a film about Israeli prime minister Golda Meir. For this she won an Emmy Award as Best Actress, but, unfortunately, she didn't live to see the fruits of her labor. Ingrid died from cancer on August 30, 1982, the day after her 67th birthday, in London, England.

MORE INFO ON Liv ULLMANN: Liv Johanne Ullmann (born 16 December 1938) is a Norwegian actress and film director. Ullman is also one of the "muses" of the Swedish director Ingmar Bergman. Nominated five times for a best actress Golden Globe Award, winning the Golden Globe Award for Best Actress - Motion Picture Drama during 1972 for the drama movie The Emigrants (1971), Ullmann has also been nominated for the Palme d'Or, twice for the Academy Award, and twice for a BAFTA Film Award.

Ullmann was born in Tokyo, Japan, the daughter of Viggo Ullmann, a Norwegian aircraft engineer who was working in Tokyo at the time, and Janna (Lund), also Norwegian. When she was two years old, the family relocated to Toronto, Ontario, Canada, where her father worked at the Norwegian air force base on Toronto Island (in Lake Ontario) during World War II. Four years later, her father died of a brain tumor, an event that affected her greatly.

Ullmann began her acting career as a stage actress in Norway during the mid-1950s. She continued to act in theatre for most of her career, and became noted for her portrayal of Nora in Henrik Ibsen's play A Doll's House, but became better known once she started to work with Swedish movie director Ingmar Bergman. She later acted, with acclaim, for 10 of his most-admired movies, including Persona (1966), The Passion of Anna (1969), Cries and Whispers (1972) and Autumn Sonata (1978), in which her co-actress, Ingrid Bergman, resumed her Swedish cinema career. She co-acted often with Swedish actor and fellow Bergman collaborator, Erland Josephson, with whom she made the Swedish television drama, Scenes from a Marriage (1973), which was also edited to feature-movie length and distributed theatrically. Ullmann acted with Laurence Olivier in A Bridge Too Far (1977), directed by Richard Attenborough.

Nominated more than 40 times for awards, including various lifetime achievement awards, she won the best actress prize three times from the National Society of Film Critics, three times from the National Board of Review, received three awards from the New York Film Critics Circle and a Golden Globe. During 1971, Ullmann was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress for the movie The Emigrants, and again during 1976 for the movie Face to Face.

Ullmann made her New York City stage debut in 1975 also in "A Doll's House." Appearances in "Anna Christie" and "Ghosts" followed, as well as the less than successful musical version of I Remember Mama. This show, composed by Richard Rodgers, experienced numerous revisions during a long preview period, then closed after 108 performances. She also featured in the widely deprecated musical movie remake of Lost Horizon during 1973.

In 1980 Brian De Palma, who directed Carrie, wanted Liv Ullmann to play the role as Kate Miller in the erotic crime thriller Dressed to Kill and offered her the role, but she declined because of the violence. The role then went on to Angie Dickinson. In 1982 Ingmar Bergman wanted Ullmann to play the main role as Emelie Ekdahl in his last feature film, Fanny and Alexander, and wrote this role for her with this in mind. But Ullmann felt this role was too sad and declined. Liv Ullmann later stated in interviews that turning down the role was one of the few things she really regrets.

During 1984 she was chairperson of the jury at the 34th Berlin International Film Festival, and during 2002 chaired the jury of Cannes Film Festival. She introduced her daughter, Linn Ullmann, to the audience with the words: "Here comes the woman whom Ingmar Bergman loves the most". Her daughter was there to receive the Prize of Honour on behalf of her father; she would return to serve the jury herself during 2011.

In 2004 Ullmann revealed that she had gotten an offer in November 2003 to play in the popular American show, Sex and the City. Ullmann was amused by the offer and said that it was one of the few she actually regularly watched, but she turned down the offer. Later that year Steven Soderbergh wrote a role specially for Liv Ullmann in the movie Ocean's 12 and offered her this role, but also this role was turned down by Ullmann.

Ullmann narrated the Canada - Norway co-produced animated short movie The Danish Poet (2006), which won the Academy Award for Animated Short Film at the 79th Academy Awards during 2007.

In 2008 she was the head of the jury at the 30th Moscow International Film Festival.

She published two autobiographies, Changing (1977) and Choices (1984).

During 2012, she attended the International Indian Film Academy Awards in Singapore, where she was honored her for Outstanding Contributions to International Cinema and she also showed her movie on her relationship with Ingmar Bergman.

Ullmann's first film as a director was Sofie (1992), in which she directed her friend and former co-actor, Erland Josephson. She later directed the Bergman-composed movie Faithless (2000) and reprised her role for Scenes from a Marriage in Saraband (2003), Bergman's final telemovie. Faithless garnered nominations for both the Palme d'Or and Best Actress at the Cannes Film Festival.

During 2006 Ullmann announced that she had been forced to end her longtime wish of making a movie based on A Doll's House. According to her statement, the Norwegian Film Fund was preventing her and writer Kjetil Bjornstad from pursuing the project. Australian actress Cate Blanchett and British actress Kate Winslet had been cast intended in the main roles of the movie. She later directed Blanchett in the play A Streetcar Named Desire, by Tennessee Williams, at the Sydney Theatre Company in Sydney, Australia, which was performed September through October 2009, and then continued from 29 October to 21 November 2009 at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C., where it won a Helen Hayes Award for Outstanding Non-resident Production as well as actress and supporting performer for 2009. The play was also performed at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in Brooklyn, New York.

In 2013 it was announced that Ullmann would direct a film adaptation of Miss Julie. The film, set to be released in 2014, stars Jessica Chastain, Colin Farrell and Samantha Morton.

In addition to Norwegian, Ullmann speaks Swedish, English and other European languages.

Ullmann has been married and divorced twice. Her first marriage was to Hans Jacob Stang, a Norwegian psychiatrist, whom she divorced during 1965. According to her biographer, Ketil Bjornstad, the marriage was marred by infidelities on both sides. She had a long affair with her colleague, Ingmar Bergman, from 1965-70. One result of the affair was her only child, Linn Ullmann, born 9 August 1966.

During the 1980s, she married Boston real estate developer Donald Saunders, whom she divorced during 1995. The couple continued to live together until 2007.

She is a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador and has traveled widely for the organization. She is also co-founder and honorary chair of the Women's Refugee Commission. In 2005, King Harald V of Norway made Ullmann a Commander with Star of the Order of St. Olav. IN 2006, she received a PhD honoris causa from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology.

This item is part of Backlot Movie Memorabilia and collectibles in-store inventory from our shop which is located in the heart of Hollywood, where we have been in business for OVER 40 years!!!

AUTUMN SONATA Original 1-Sheet POSTER Liv Ullmann INGRID BERGMAN Ingmar MOVIE 78
Item #BMM0003824