$29.99


This is an ORIGINAL Spanish 1-Sheet Movie Poster measuring approx 27" x 41." It has edgewear and tears on the sides, a couple panel are separated, and there are splits in other sections and a side tear, but poster is complete and colors are bright for OVER 65 years old!

This poster is all Original on kraft paper from PARAMOUNT PICTURES. This poster was to promote in South America in theaters, the 1952 Musical Comedy Romance

HERE COMES THE GROOM

Foreign correspondent Pete Garvey has 5 days to win back his former fiancée, or he'll lose the orphans he adopted. Pete Garvey, foreign correspondent, has been running an impromptu adoption agency for war orphans in Paris, when an ultimatum from his erstwhile fiancée Emmadel Jones draws him back to Boston, complete with two adopted orphans to melt her heart. Too late! She's now engaged to rich, handsome Wilbur Stanley. And if Pete's not married within five days, he loses the kids. He'll have to work fast ... Director: Frank Capra

Writers: Robert Riskin (story and treatment "You Belong to Me"), Liam O'Brien (story)

Stars: Bing Crosby, Jane Wyman, Alexis Smith

Cast:

Bing Crosby ... Peter 'Pete' Garvey
Jane Wyman ... Emmadel Jones
Alexis Smith ... Winifred Stanley
Franchot Tone ... Wilbur Stanley
James Barton ... William 'Pa' Jones
Robert Keith ... George Degnan
Jacques Gencel ... Bobby (as Jacky Gencel)
H.B. Warner ... Uncle Elihu
Beverly Washburn ... Suzi
Nicholas Joy ... Uncle Prentiss
Connie Gilchrist ... Ma Jones
Ian Wolfe ... Uncle Adam
Walter Catlett ... Mr. McGonigle
Ellen Corby ... Mrs. McGonigle
Alan Reed ... Walter Godfrey

Poster features great photo art images of the four leads! It is all Original!

Shop with confidence! This is part of our in-store inventory from our shop which is has been located in the heart of Hollywood where we have been in business for the OVER 40 years!

MORE INFO ON BING CROSBY: Harry Lillis "Bing" Crosby (May 3, 1903 - October 14, 1977) was an American popular singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death.

One of the first multimedia stars, from 1934 to 1954 Bing Crosby held a nearly unrivaled command of record sales, radio ratings and motion picture grosses. Widely recognized as one of the most popular musical acts in history, Crosby is also credited as being the major inspiration for most of the male singers of the era that followed him, including Frank Sinatra , Perry Como , and Dean Martin . Yank magazine recognized Crosby as the person who had done the most for American G.I. morale during World War II and, during his peak years, around 1948, polls declared him the "most admired man alive," ahead of Jackie Robinson and Pope Pius XII . Also during 1948, the Music Digest estimated that Crosby recordings filled more than half of the 80,000 weekly hours allocated to recorded radio music.

Crosby exerted an important influence on the development of the postwar recording industry. In 1947, he invested US $50,000 in the Ampex company, which developed North America's first commercial reel-to-reel tape recorder , and Crosby became the first performer to pre-record his radio shows and master his commercial recordings on magnetic tape. He gave one of the first Ampex Model 200 recorders to his friend, musician Les Paul , which led directly to Paul's invention of multitrack recording . Along with Frank Sinatra , he was one of the principal backers behind the famous United Western Recorders studio complex in Los Angeles.

In 1962, Crosby was the first person to receive the Global Achievement Award . He won an Academy Award for Best Actor for his role as Father Chuck O'Malley in the 1944 motion picture Going My Way . Crosby is one of the few people to have three stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame

Harry Lillis Crosby was born in Tacoma, Washington , on May 3, 1903, in a house his father built at 1112 North J Street. His family moved to Spokane, Washington in 1906 to find work.

He was the fourth of seven children: five boys, Larry (1895-1975), Everett (1896-1966), Ted (1900-1973), Harry 'Bing' (1903-1977), and Bob (1913-1993); and two girls, Catherine (1904-1974) and Mary Rose (1906-"1990). His parents were English - American Harry Lincoln Crosby (1870-1950), a bookkeeper, and Irish-American Catherine Helen (affectionately known as Kate) Harrigan (187-1964). Kate was the daughter of Canadian-born parents Dennis and Catherine Harrigan who had emigrated to the Stillwater, Mn from Miramichi, New Brunswick. . His maternal grandfather and grandmother, Dennis and Catherine Harrigan, came from Schull , County Cork in Ireland . His paternal ancestors include Governor Thomas Prence and Patience Brewster, both born in England and immigrated to the U.S. in the 17th century. Patience was a daughter of Elder William Brewster (pilgrim) , (c. 1567 - April 10, 1644), the Pilgrim leader and spiritual elder of the Plymouth Colony and a passenger on the Mayflower .

In 1910, Crosby was forever renamed. The six-year-old Harry Lillis discovered a full-page feature in the Sunday edition of the Spokesman-Review , "The Bingville Bugle." The "Bugle," written by humorist Newton Newkirk, was a parody of a hillbilly newsletter complete with gossipy tidbits, minstrel quips, creative spelling, and mock ads. A neighbor, 15-year-old Valentine Hobart, shared Crosby's enthusiasm for "The Bugle," and noting Crosby's laugh, took a liking to him and called him "Bingo from Bingville." The last vowel was dropped and the name shortened to "Bing," which stuck.

In 1917, Crosby took a summer job as property boy at Spokane's "Auditorium," where he witnessed some of the finest acts of the day, including Al Jolson , who held Crosby spellbound with his ad-libbing and spoofs of Hawaiian songs.

In the fall of 1920, Crosby enrolled in the Jesuit -run Gonzaga University in Spokane, Washington , with the intention of becoming a lawyer. He sent away for a set of mail-order drums. After much practice, he soon became good enough and was invited to join a local band made up of mostly local high school kids called the "Musicaladers," managed by Al Rinker . He made so much money doing this that he decided to drop out of school during his final year to pursue a career in show business.

In 1926, while singing at Los Angeles Metropolitan Theatre, Crosby and his vocal duo partner Al Rinker caught the eye of Paul Whiteman , arguably the most famous bandleader at the time. Hired for $150 a week, they made their debut on December 6, 1926 at the Tivoli Theatre (Chicago) . Their first recording, "I've Got The Girl," with Don Clark's Orchestra, was issued by Columbia and did them no vocal favors as it sounded as if they were singing in a key much too high for them. It was later revealed that the 78rpm was recorded at a speed slower than it should have been, which increased the pitch when played at 78rpm.

As popular as the Crosby and Rinker duo was, Whiteman added another member to the group, pianist and aspiring songwriter Harry Barris . Whiteman dubbed them The Rhythm Boys , and they joined the Whiteman vocal team, working and recording with musicians Bix Beiderbecke , Jack Teagarden , Tommy Dorsey , Jimmy Dorsey , and Eddie Lang and singers Mildred Bailey and Hoagy Carmichael .

Crosby soon became the star attraction of the Rhythm Boys , not to mention Whiteman's band, and in 1928 had his first number one hit, a jazz-influenced rendition of " Ol' Man River ." However, his repeated youthful peccadilloes and growing dissatisfaction with Whiteman forced him, along with the Rhythm Boys , to leave the band and join the Gus Arnheim Orchestra. During his time with Arnheim, The Rhythm Boys were increasingly pushed to the background as the vocal emphasis focused on Crosby. Fellow member of The Rhythm Boys Harry Barris wrote several of Crosby's subsequent hits including "At Your Command," " I Surrender Dear ," and " Wrap Your Troubles In Dreams "; however, shortly after this, the members of the band had a falling out and split, setting the stage for Crosby's solo career. In 1931, he signed with Brunswick Records and recording under Jack Kapp and signed with CBS Radio to do a weekly 15 minute radio broadcast; almost immediately he became a huge hit.

As the 1930s unfolded, it became clear that Bing was the number one man, vocally speaking. Ten of the top 50 songs for 1931 either featured Crosby solo or with others. Apart from the short-lived "Battle of the Baritones" with Russ Columbo , "Bing Was King," signing long-term deals with Jack Kapp 's new record company Decca and starring in his first full-length features, 1932's The Big Broadcast , the first of 55 such films in which he received top billing. He appeared in 79 pictures.

Around this time Crosby made his solo debut on radio, co-starring with The Carl Fenton Orchestra on a popular CBS radio show, and by 1936 replacing his former boss, Paul Whiteman , as the host of NBC 's Kraft Music Hall , a weekly radio program where he remained for the next ten years. As his signature tune he used " Where the Blue of the Night (Meets the Gold of the Day) ", which also showcased his whistling skill.

He was thus able to take popular singing beyond the kind of " belting " associated with a performer like Al Jolson , who had to reach the back seats in New York theatres without the aid of the microphone. With Crosby, as Henry Pleasants noted in The Great American Popular Singers, something new had entered American music, something that might be called "singing in American," with conversational ease. The oddity of this new sound led to the epithet " crooner ."

Crosby gave great emphasis to live appearances before American troops fighting in the European Theater . He also learned how to pronounce German from written scripts and would read them in propaganda broadcasts intended for the German forces. The nickname "der Bingle" for him was understood to have become current among German listeners, and came to be used by his English -speaking fans. In a poll of U.S. troops at the close of WWII, Crosby topped the list as the person who did the most for G.I. morale, beating out President Franklin Delano Roosevelt , General Dwight Eisenhower , and Bob Hope .

Crosby's biggest musical hit was his recording of Irving Berlin 's " White Christmas ", which he introduced through a 1942 Christmas-season radio broadcast and the movie Holiday Inn . Crosby's recording hit the charts on October 3, 1942, and rose to #1 on October 31, where it stayed for 11 weeks. In the following years, his recording hit the Top 30 pop charts another 16 times, topping the charts again in 1945 and January 1947. The song remains Crosby's best-selling recording, and the best-selling single and best-selling song of all time. In 1998, after a long absence, his 1947 version hit the charts in Britain, and as of 2006 [update] remains the North American holiday-season standard. According to Guinness World Records , Crosby's recording of "White Christmas" has "sold over 100 million copies around the world, with at least 50 million sales as singles."

Crosby (1942) with golf balls for the Scrap Rubber Drive during World War II

According to ticket sales, Crosby is, at 1,077,900,000 tickets sold, the third most popular actor of all time, behind Clark Gable and John Wayne . Crosby is, according to Quigley Publishing Company's International Motion Picture Almanac, tied for second on the "All Time Number One Stars List" with Clint Eastwood , Tom Hanks , and Burt Reynolds . Crosby's most popular film, White Christmas , grossed $30 million in 1954 ($229 million in 2007 dollars). Crosby won an Academy Award for Best Actor for Going My Way in 1944, a role he reprised in the 1945 sequel The Bells of Saint Mary's , for which he was nominated for another Academy Award for Best Actor . He received critical acclaim for his performance as an alcoholic entertainer in The Country Girl , receiving his third Academy Award nomination. He partnered with Bob Hope in seven Road to musical comedies between 1940 and 1962 and the two actors remained linked for generations in general public perception as arguably the most popular screen team in film history, despite never officially declaring themselves a "team" in the sense that Laurel and Hardy or Martin and Lewis were teams.

By the late 1950s, Crosby's popularity had peaked, and the adolescence of the baby boom generation began to affect record sales to younger customers. In 1960, Crosby starred in High Time , a collegiate comedy with Fabian and Tuesday Weld that foretold the emerging gap between older Crosby fans and a new generation of films and music.

The Fireside Theater (1950) was Crosby's first television production. The series of 26-minute shows was filmed at Hal Roach Studios rather than performed live on the air. The "telefilms" were syndicated to individual television stations.

Bing Crosby Productions, affiliated with Desilu Studios and later CBS Television Studios , produced a number of television series, including Crosby's own unsuccessful ABC sitcom The Bing Crosby Show in the 1964-1965 season (with co-stars Beverly Garland and Frank McHugh ), and two ABC medical dramas , Ben Casey (1961-1966) and Breaking Point (1963-1964), and the popular Hogan's Heroes military comedy on CBS, as well as the lesser-known show Slattery's People (1964-1965).

Crosby perfected an idea that Al Jolson had hinted at, that the popular performer did not have to limit himself to a mere series of shticks but could be a genuine artist in this case, a musician . Before Crosby, art was art and pop was pop; opera singers worried about staying in tune and reaching the upper balcony, vaudevillians concerned themselves with their costumes and facial expressions .

Crosby rendered the difference between the two irrelevant. Where earlier recording artists had displayed strictly one-dimensional attitudes, Crosby not only perfected the fully rounded persona , but brought with it the technical ability of a true concert artist. Crosby projected with a majestic sense of intonation that afforded Tin Pan Alley the musical stature of European classics and a jazz influenced time that made him the dominant voice of both the Jazz age and the Swing era.

Crosby also elaborated on a further idea of Al Jolson 's, one that Frank Sinatra would ultimately extend: phrasing, or the art of making a song's lyric ring true. "I used to tell (Sinatra) over and over," said Tommy Dorsey , "there's only one singer you ought to listen to and his name is Crosby. All that matters to him is the words , and that's the only thing that ought to for you, too."

The greatest trick of Crosby's virtuosity was covering it up. It is often said that Crosby made his singing and acting "look easy," or as if it were no work at all: he simply was the character he portrayed, and his singing, being a direct extension of conversation, came just as naturally to him as talking, or even breathing. Journalist Donald Freeman said of Crosby, "There is only one Bing Crosby and "the time has come now to face the issue squarely" he happens to be that unique, awesome creature, an artist."

MORE INFO ON JANE WYMAN: Jane Wyman was born Sarah Jane Mayfield on January 5, 1917, in St. Joseph, Missouri (she was also known later as Sarah Jane Fulks). When she was only eight years old, and after her parents filed for divorce, she lost her father prematurely. After graduating high school she attempted, with the help of her mother, to break into films, but to no avail. In 1932, after attending the University of Missouri, she began a career as a radio singer, which led to her first name change to Jane Durrell. In 1936 she signed a contract with Warner Bros. Pictures and that led to another name change, the more familiar one of Jane Wyman. Under that name she appeared in "A" and "B" pictures at Warners, including two with her future husband, Ronald Reagan: Brother Rat (1938) and its sequel, Brother Rat and a Baby (1940). In the early 1940s she moved into comedies and melodramas and gained attention for her role as Ray Milland's long-suffering girlfriend in The Lost Weekend (1945). The following year she was nominated for a Best Actress Oscar for her role as Ma Baxter in The Yearling (1946), and won the coveted prize in 1949 as deaf-mute rape victim Belinda MacDonald in Johnny Belinda (1948). She followed that with a number of appearances in more prestigious films, such as Alfred Hitchcock's Stage Fright (1950), Frank Capra's Here Comes the Groom (1951), Michael Curtiz's The Story of Will Rogers (1952) and the first movie version of The Glass Menagerie (1950). She starred opposite Bing Crosby in the musical Just for You (1952). She was Oscar-nominated for her performances in The Blue Veil (1951) and Magnificent Obsession (1954). She also starred in the immensely popular So Big (1953), Lucy Gallant (1955), All That Heaven Allows (1955) and Miracle in the Rain (1956). In addition to her extensive film career, she hosted TV's Jane Wyman Presents The Fireside Theatre (1955) and starred in most of the episodes of the show, which ran for three seasons. She came back to the big screen in Holiday for Lovers (1959), Pollyanna (1960) and her final film, How to Commit Marriage (1969). Although off the big screen, she became a presence on the small screen and starred in two made-for-TV movies, including The Incredible Journey of Doctor Meg Laurel (1979). In early 1981, in the 49th year of her career, she won the role of conniving matriarch Angela Channing Erikson Stavros Agretti in the movie "The Vintage Years", which was the unaired pilot for the prime-time soap opera Falcon Crest (1981), later in the year. For nine seasons she played that character in a way that virtually no other actress could have done, and became the moral center of the show. The show was a ratings winner from its debut in 1981, and made stars out of her fellow cast members Robert Foxworth, Lorenzo Lamas, Abby Dalton and Susan Sullivan. At the end of the first season the storyline had her being informed that her evil son, played by David Selby, had inherited 50% of a California newspaper company, and the conflicts inherent in that situation led to even bigger ratings over the next five years. Wyman was nominated six times for a Soap Opera Digest Award, and in 1984 she won the Golden Globe for Best Performance by an Actress in a TV Series Drama. By the show's eighth season, however, she was emotionally drained and the strain of constantly working to keep up the quality of a hit show took its toll on her. In addition, there was friction on the set among cast members. All of these events culminated in her departure from the show after the first two episodes of the ninth season (her character was hospitalized and slipped into a coma) for health reasons. After a period of recuperation, she believed that she had recovered enough to guest-star in the last three episodes of the season (her doctor disagreed, but she did it anyway). She then guest-starred as Jane Seymour's mother on Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman (1993) and three years later appeared in Wild Bill: Hollywood Maverick (1995). In the late 1990s she purchased a home in Rancho Mirage, California, where she's still living in retirement. Her daughter, Maureen Reagan (who died in August 2001), was a writer who also involved herself in political issues and organized a powerful foundation. Also, she placed her 3200-sq.-ft. Rancho Mirage condominium on the market. Jane Wyman died at the age of 90, at her Palm Springs, California home, on September 10, 2007, having long suffered from arthritis and diabetes. It was reported that Wyman died in her sleep of natural causes at the Rancho Mirage Country Club.

This item is part of Backlot Movie Memorabilia and collectibles in-store inventory from our shop which is located in the heart of Hollywood, where we have been in business for OVER 40 years!!!

HERE COMES THE GROOM Spanish POSTER Jane Wyman BING CROSBY Alexis Smith 1951
Item #BMM0003800