$29.99


Great ORIGINAL Script from DAVID GERBER Productions, from the series, that helped create spin-off series for ANGIE DICKINSON ( Policewoman ) and DAVID CASSIDY ( MAN: UNDERCOVER ). This is an original Script for another Proposed spin-off series, METRO SQUAD. It did not sell as a series, so it became episode 17 for Season one of the popular NBC Crime Drama Series,

Police Story

Creator: DAVID GERBER

Classic anthology series, which details the personal lives of the men and women of the Los Angeles Police Department. The stories ranged from highly dramatic to extremely funny. Even though there weren't any real regulars, Don Meredith and Tony LoBianco were often seen throughout the run of the show as detectives Bert Jameson and Tony Calabrese respectively.

This particular episode was retitled:

The Hunters

Detectives Calabrese and Jameson become emotionally involved in a robbery/homicide/rape crime spree when a friend becomes a victim. Originally aired on Oct 23, 1973. This title was changed from "The Hunters" to "Big John Morrison".

Director: Richard Benedict

Writers: Joseph Wambaugh (creator), Sy Salkowitz

Stars: Tony Lo Bianco, Don Meredith, Jackie Cooper

Cast

Tony Lo Bianco ... Tony Calabrese
Don Meredith ... Bert Jameson
Jackie Cooper ... John Morrison
Dane Clark ... Lt. Pete Stohler
Sharon Farrell ... Bobbie
Nehemiah Persoff ... Fabrizzio
Frankie Avalon ... David Koslenko (as Frank Avalon)
Sal Mineo ... Stippy
Art Metrano ... Dominic
Joby Baker ... Macon
Mills Watson ... Mickey
Milton Selzer ... Lou Gold
Claudette Nevins ... Ellen Calabrese
Clark Howat ... Man in Bar
Jack Soo ... Taiske

SCRIPT is COMPLETE and ALL ORIGINAL! It's the FINAL DRAFT from December 27, 1973. It is complete with 102 pages. Great collectible on this series you don't find every day.

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Police Story is an anthology television crime drama that aired on NBC from 1973 through 1978. The show was the brainchild of author and former policeman Joseph Wambaugh and represented a major step forward in the realistic depiction of police work and violence on network TV. It was produced by David Gerber and Mel Swope.

Although it was an anthology, there were certain things that all episodes had in common; for instance, the main character in each episode was a police officer. The setting was always Los Angeles and the characters always worked for some branch of the LAPD. Also, notwithstanding the anthology format, there were recurring characters. Scott Brady appeared in more than a dozen episodes as "Vinnie," a former cop who, upon retirement, had opened a bar catering to police officers, and who acted as a sort of Greek chorus during the run of the series, commenting on the characters and plots. Tony Lo Bianco and Don Meredith made several appearances as Robbery-Homicide Division partners Tony Calabrese and Bert Jameson. Other recurring characters included surveillance specialist Joe LaFrieda, played by Vic Morrow, and vice officer turned homicide detective Charlie Czonka, played by James Farentino.

The anthology format allowed the show to try out characters and settings for series development, and, during its broadcast run, Police Story generated three spin-offs. A first-season episode, "The Gamble," starring Angie Dickinson, became the pilot for the successful Police Woman series, which ran from 1974-1978. "The Return of Joe Forrester," a second-season episode starring Lloyd Bridges, was developed into the weekly series Joe Forrester. "A Chance to Live," an episode from the fifth season, with David Cassidy, became Man Undercover.

In later seasons, perhaps because of the expense of maintaining the anthology format on a weekly basis, Police Story became a series of irregularly scheduled TV-movies.

Police Story was a precursor to later shows such as Hill Street Blues, ABC's NYPD Blue and NBC's own Homicide: Life on the Street in 1993.

Numerous actors, sports figures and former real cops who were familiar to audiences in the 1960s and 1970s made appearances on the series, including Ed Asner, David Janssen, Claude Akins, Robert Stack, Mike Connors, Stuart Whitman, Lenore Kasdorf, John Saxon, Cameron Mitchell, Martin Milner, Vince Edwards, Robert Forster, Jan-Michael Vincent, Alex Cord, George Maharis, Wayne Maunder, Howard Duff, Chad Everett, Don Meredith, Sylvester Stallone, Michael Cole (2 episodes), and Eddie Egan.

Two episodes received an Edgar Award from the Mystery Writers of America for Best Episode in a Television Series: "Requiem for an Informer," written by Sy Salkowitz (from the first season), and "Requiem for C.Z. Smith," by Robert E. Collins (second season). In 1976, the show won the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Drama Series.

MORE INFO ON SAL MINEO: Salvatore (Sal) Mineo Jr. was born to Josephine and Sal Sr. (a casket maker), who emigrated to the U.S. from Sicily. His siblings were Michael, Victor and Sarina. Sal was thrown out of parochial school and, by age eight, was a member of a street gang in a tough Bronx neighborhood. His mother enrolled him in dancing school and, after being arrested for robbery at age ten, he was given a choice of juvenile confinement or professional acting school.

He soon appeared in the theatrical production "The Rose Tattoo" with Maureen Stapleton and Eli Wallach and as the young prince in "The King and I" with Gertrude Lawrence and Yul Brynner. At age 16 he played a much younger boy in Six Bridges to Cross (1955) with Tony Curtis and later that same year played Plato in James Dean's Rebel Without a Cause (1955). He was nominated for Best Supporting Actor for his performance in this film and again for his role as Dov Landau in Exodus (1960).

Expanding his repertoire, Mineo returned to the theatre to direct and star in the play "Fortune and Men's Eyes" with successful runs in both New York and Los Angeles. In the late 1960s and 1970s he continued to work steadily in supporting roles on TV and in film, including Dr. Milo in Escape from the Planet of the Apes (1971) and Harry O (1973). In 1975 he returned to the stage in the San Francisco hit production of "P.S. Your Cat Is Dead". Preparing to open the play in Los Angeles in 1976 with Keir Dullea, he returned home from rehearsal the evening of February 12th when he was attacked and stabbed to death by a stranger. A drifter named Lionel Ray Williams was arrested for the crime and, after trial in 1979, convicted and sentenced to life in prison for the murder. Although taken away far too soon, the memory of Sal Mineo continues to live on through the large body of TV and film work that he left behind.

MORE INFO ON TONY LO BIANCO: The career of actor Tony Lo Bianco is distinguished as much by its depth and variety, as by the skills and gifts Mr. Lo Bianco has brought to his work. He has appeared in numerous films, television programs, and stage performances, both on-screen and off as a writer, director, and producer. Throughout his career, Mr. Lo Bianco has collaborated with many of the brightest creative minds in the performing arts, both past and present.

On stage, Mr. Lo Bianco won an Obie Award for Best Actor in Jonathan Reynold's Yanks-3, Detroit-0, Top of the 7th. Following his memorable performance as Eddie Carbone in Arthur Miller's A View from the Bridge on Broadway, he was nominated for the Tony Award for Best Actor, and won the Outer Critics Circle Award. He also won a New York Area Television Academy Award and daytime Emmy for Hizzoner! The Life of Mayor Fiorello La Guardia.

Mr. Lo Bianco is a Brooklyn born New Yorker who enjoys the opportunity of portraying many different characters on stage, film, and television. His best known film performances are as Sal Boca in the five-time Academy Award winning film The French Connection with Gene Hackman and Roy Scheider. He starred in the cult classic The Honeymoon Killers, which French director Francois Truffaut's favorite film. He also starred in The Seven-Ups with Roy Scheider; starred with Richard Gere and Paul Sorvino in Bloodbrothers; City Heat with Clint Eastwood and Burt Reynolds; Director Oliver Stone's Nixon with the great Anthony Hopkins; The Juror with Alec Baldwin and Demi Moore; F.I.S.T. with Sylvester Stallone and Rod Steiger; Boiling Point with Wesley Snipes and Dennis Hopper; the cult classic God Told Me To; and Kill the Irishman with Val Kilmer, Vincent D'onofrio, and Christopher Walken; and La Romana with Gina Lollabrigida. Mr. Lo Bianco has done 102 films to date.

On television, Mr. Lo Bianco starred as Rocky Marciano, the only undefeated heavy weight champ of the world, in Marciano. He appeared in the mini-series Marco Polo and Jesus of Nazareth directed by the great Franco Zeffirelli. He also starred in The Last Tenant with legendary acting teacher Lee Strasberg. He has appeared over the years in several Law & Order episodes; Police Story; Jessie with Lindsay Wagner; Another Woman's Child with Linda Lavin; among many others. As a director, Mr. Lo Bianco directed several episodes of television, including Police Story; The Duke; Cliffhangers; When the Whistle Blows; Kaz; and the feature film Too Scared to Scream.

In 1963, Mr. Lo Bianco co-founded the Triangle Theater and served as artistic director for six years, during which time lighting designer Jules Fisher, playwright Jason Miller, and actor Roy Scheider, passed through its doors. Mr. Lo Bianco himself directed eight productions and produced twenty-five others.

Mr. Lo Bianco served as the National Spokesperson for the Order Sons of Italy. His many humanitarian efforts have earned multiple awards, including the Eleanora Duse Award for Outstanding Contribution to the Performing Arts; Man of the Year for Outstanding Contributions to the Italian-American Community from the Police Society of New Jersey; a Man of the Year Award from the State of New Jersey Senate; a Lifetime Entertainment Award from the Columbus Day Parade Committee; the 1997 Golden Lion Award; and the Humanitarian Award of the Boys' Town of Italy, the Ellis Island Medal of honor and is a member of the Italian American National Hall of Fame. He is a strong supporter of our men and women in uniform in the service of our country, both domestic and abroad.

This item is part of Backlot Movie Memorabilia and collectibles in-store inventory from our shop which is located in the heart of Hollywood, where we have been in business for the past 40 years!!!

POLICE STORY Original SCRIPT Anthology SAL MINEO Tony Lo Bianco NBC
Item #BMM0002948