$49.99


This is a Vintage Set of 11" x 14" Original LOBBY CARDS. They do have some wear, staples, a couple torn corners and tape marks. There is writing on the back. These were used OVER 60 Years ago in a film theater lobby. Each card features great Photo images from the popular M.G.M. Metro-Goldwyn Mayer Loew's 1957 Drama,

Man on Fire

A wealthy businessman whose wife has divorced him is bitter about the divorce and prevents his ex-wife from seeing their child. The ex-wife takes him to court, and a judge tries to determine what will be best for the child.

Director: Ranald MacDougall

Writers: Jack Jacobs (story), Ranald MacDougall

Stars: Bing Crosby, Inger Stevens, Mary Fickett

Cast

Bing Crosby ... Earl Carleton
Inger Stevens ... Nina Wylie
Mary Fickett ... Gwen Seward
E.G. Marshall ... Sam Dunstock
Malcolm Brodrick ... Theodore 'Ted' Carleton
Richard Eastham ... Bryan Seward
Anne Seymour ... Judge Randolph
Dan Riss ... Mack

It's a nice set of Lobbies in the original plastic bag. Great for the Bing Crosby or 50's film Collector or fan of these stars!

Shop with confidence! This is part of our in-store inventory from our shop which is has been located in the heart of Hollywood where we have been in business for OVER 40 years!

MORE INFO ON BING CROSBY: Harry Lillis "Bing" Crosby (May 3, 1903 - October 14, 1977) was an American popular singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death.

One of the first multimedia stars, from 1934 to 1954 Bing Crosby held a nearly unrivaled command of record sales, radio ratings and motion picture grosses. Widely recognized as one of the most popular musical acts in history, Crosby is also credited as being the major inspiration for most of the male singers of the era that followed him, including Frank Sinatra , Perry Como , and Dean Martin . Yank magazine recognized Crosby as the person who had done the most for American G.I. morale during World War II and, during his peak years, around 1948, polls declared him the "most admired man alive," ahead of Jackie Robinson and Pope Pius XII . Also during 1948, the Music Digest estimated that Crosby recordings filled more than half of the 80,000 weekly hours allocated to recorded radio music.

Crosby exerted an important influence on the development of the postwar recording industry. In 1947, he invested US $50,000 in the Ampex company, which developed North America's first commercial reel-to-reel tape recorder , and Crosby became the first performer to pre-record his radio shows and master his commercial recordings on magnetic tape. He gave one of the first Ampex Model 200 recorders to his friend, musician Les Paul , which led directly to Paul's invention of multitrack recording . Along with Frank Sinatra , he was one of the principal backers behind the famous United Western Recorders studio complex in Los Angeles.

In 1962, Crosby was the first person to receive the Global Achievement Award . He won an Academy Award for Best Actor for his role as Father Chuck O'Malley in the 1944 motion picture Going My Way . Crosby is one of the few people to have three stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame

Harry Lillis Crosby was born in Tacoma, Washington , on May 3, 1903, in a house his father built at 1112 North J Street. His family moved to Spokane, Washington in 1906 to find work.

He was the fourth of seven children: five boys, Larry (1895-1975), Everett (1896-1966), Ted (1900-1973), Harry 'Bing' (1903-1977), and Bob (1913-1993); and two girls, Catherine (1904-1974) and Mary Rose (1906-"1990). His parents were English - American Harry Lincoln Crosby (1870-1950), a bookkeeper, and Irish-American Catherine Helen (affectionately known as Kate) Harrigan (187-1964). Kate was the daughter of Canadian-born parents Dennis and Catherine Harrigan who had emigrated to the Stillwater, Mn from Miramichi, New Brunswick. . His maternal grandfather and grandmother, Dennis and Catherine Harrigan, came from Schull , County Cork in Ireland . His paternal ancestors include Governor Thomas Prence and Patience Brewster, both born in England and immigrated to the U.S. in the 17th century. Patience was a daughter of Elder William Brewster (pilgrim) , (c. 1567 - April 10, 1644), the Pilgrim leader and spiritual elder of the Plymouth Colony and a passenger on the Mayflower .

In 1910, Crosby was forever renamed. The six-year-old Harry Lillis discovered a full-page feature in the Sunday edition of the Spokesman-Review , "The Bingville Bugle." The "Bugle," written by humorist Newton Newkirk, was a parody of a hillbilly newsletter complete with gossipy tidbits, minstrel quips, creative spelling, and mock ads. A neighbor, 15-year-old Valentine Hobart, shared Crosby's enthusiasm for "The Bugle," and noting Crosby's laugh, took a liking to him and called him "Bingo from Bingville." The last vowel was dropped and the name shortened to "Bing," which stuck.

In 1917, Crosby took a summer job as property boy at Spokane's "Auditorium," where he witnessed some of the finest acts of the day, including Al Jolson , who held Crosby spellbound with his ad-libbing and spoofs of Hawaiian songs.

In the fall of 1920, Crosby enrolled in the Jesuit -run Gonzaga University in Spokane, Washington , with the intention of becoming a lawyer. He sent away for a set of mail-order drums. After much practice, he soon became good enough and was invited to join a local band made up of mostly local high school kids called the "Musicaladers," managed by Al Rinker . He made so much money doing this that he decided to drop out of school during his final year to pursue a career in show business.

In 1926, while singing at Los Angeles Metropolitan Theatre, Crosby and his vocal duo partner Al Rinker caught the eye of Paul Whiteman , arguably the most famous bandleader at the time. Hired for $150 a week, they made their debut on December 6, 1926 at the Tivoli Theatre (Chicago) . Their first recording, "I've Got The Girl," with Don Clark's Orchestra, was issued by Columbia and did them no vocal favors as it sounded as if they were singing in a key much too high for them. It was later revealed that the 78rpm was recorded at a speed slower than it should have been, which increased the pitch when played at 78rpm.

As popular as the Crosby and Rinker duo was, Whiteman added another member to the group, pianist and aspiring songwriter Harry Barris . Whiteman dubbed them The Rhythm Boys , and they joined the Whiteman vocal team, working and recording with musicians Bix Beiderbecke , Jack Teagarden , Tommy Dorsey , Jimmy Dorsey , and Eddie Lang and singers Mildred Bailey and Hoagy Carmichael .

Crosby soon became the star attraction of the Rhythm Boys , not to mention Whiteman's band, and in 1928 had his first number one hit, a jazz-influenced rendition of " Ol' Man River ." However, his repeated youthful peccadilloes and growing dissatisfaction with Whiteman forced him, along with the Rhythm Boys , to leave the band and join the Gus Arnheim Orchestra. During his time with Arnheim, The Rhythm Boys were increasingly pushed to the background as the vocal emphasis focused on Crosby. Fellow member of The Rhythm Boys Harry Barris wrote several of Crosby's subsequent hits including "At Your Command," " I Surrender Dear ," and " Wrap Your Troubles In Dreams "; however, shortly after this, the members of the band had a falling out and split, setting the stage for Crosby's solo career. In 1931, he signed with Brunswick Records and recording under Jack Kapp and signed with CBS Radio to do a weekly 15 minute radio broadcast; almost immediately he became a huge hit.

As the 1930s unfolded, it became clear that Bing was the number one man, vocally speaking. Ten of the top 50 songs for 1931 either featured Crosby solo or with others. Apart from the short-lived "Battle of the Baritones" with Russ Columbo , "Bing Was King," signing long-term deals with Jack Kapp 's new record company Decca and starring in his first full-length features, 1932's The Big Broadcast , the first of 55 such films in which he received top billing. He appeared in 79 pictures.

Around this time Crosby made his solo debut on radio, co-starring with The Carl Fenton Orchestra on a popular CBS radio show, and by 1936 replacing his former boss, Paul Whiteman , as the host of NBC 's Kraft Music Hall , a weekly radio program where he remained for the next ten years. As his signature tune he used " Where the Blue of the Night (Meets the Gold of the Day) ", which also showcased his whistling skill.

He was thus able to take popular singing beyond the kind of " belting " associated with a performer like Al Jolson , who had to reach the back seats in New York theatres without the aid of the microphone. With Crosby, as Henry Pleasants noted in The Great American Popular Singers, something new had entered American music, something that might be called "singing in American," with conversational ease. The oddity of this new sound led to the epithet " crooner ."

Crosby gave great emphasis to live appearances before American troops fighting in the European Theater . He also learned how to pronounce German from written scripts and would read them in propaganda broadcasts intended for the German forces. The nickname "der Bingle" for him was understood to have become current among German listeners, and came to be used by his English -speaking fans. In a poll of U.S. troops at the close of WWII, Crosby topped the list as the person who did the most for G.I. morale, beating out President Franklin Delano Roosevelt , General Dwight Eisenhower , and Bob Hope .

Crosby's biggest musical hit was his recording of Irving Berlin 's " White Christmas ", which he introduced through a 1942 Christmas-season radio broadcast and the movie Holiday Inn . Crosby's recording hit the charts on October 3, 1942, and rose to #1 on October 31, where it stayed for 11 weeks. In the following years, his recording hit the Top 30 pop charts another 16 times, topping the charts again in 1945 and January 1947. The song remains Crosby's best-selling recording, and the best-selling single and best-selling song of all time. In 1998, after a long absence, his 1947 version hit the charts in Britain, and as of 2006 [update] remains the North American holiday-season standard. According to Guinness World Records , Crosby's recording of "White Christmas" has "sold over 100 million copies around the world, with at least 50 million sales as singles."

Crosby (1942) with golf balls for the Scrap Rubber Drive during World War II

According to ticket sales, Crosby is, at 1,077,900,000 tickets sold, the third most popular actor of all time, behind Clark Gable and John Wayne . Crosby is, according to Quigley Publishing Company's International Motion Picture Almanac, tied for second on the "All Time Number One Stars List" with Clint Eastwood , Tom Hanks , and Burt Reynolds . Crosby's most popular film, White Christmas , grossed $30 million in 1954 ($229 million in 2007 dollars). Crosby won an Academy Award for Best Actor for Going My Way in 1944, a role he reprised in the 1945 sequel The Bells of Saint Mary's , for which he was nominated for another Academy Award for Best Actor . He received critical acclaim for his performance as an alcoholic entertainer in The Country Girl , receiving his third Academy Award nomination. He partnered with Bob Hope in seven Road to musical comedies between 1940 and 1962 and the two actors remained linked for generations in general public perception as arguably the most popular screen team in film history, despite never officially declaring themselves a "team" in the sense that Laurel and Hardy or Martin and Lewis were teams.

By the late 1950s, Crosby's popularity had peaked, and the adolescence of the baby boom generation began to affect record sales to younger customers. In 1960, Crosby starred in High Time , a collegiate comedy with Fabian and Tuesday Weld that foretold the emerging gap between older Crosby fans and a new generation of films and music.

The Fireside Theater (1950) was Crosby's first television production. The series of 26-minute shows was filmed at Hal Roach Studios rather than performed live on the air. The "telefilms" were syndicated to individual television stations.

Bing Crosby Productions, affiliated with Desilu Studios and later CBS Television Studios , produced a number of television series, including Crosby's own unsuccessful ABC sitcom The Bing Crosby Show in the 1964-1965 season (with co-stars Beverly Garland and Frank McHugh ), and two ABC medical dramas , Ben Casey (1961-1966) and Breaking Point (1963-1964), and the popular Hogan's Heroes military comedy on CBS, as well as the lesser-known show Slattery's People (1964-1965).

Crosby perfected an idea that Al Jolson had hinted at, that the popular performer did not have to limit himself to a mere series of shticks but could be a genuine artist in this case, a musician . Before Crosby, art was art and pop was pop; opera singers worried about staying in tune and reaching the upper balcony, vaudevillians concerned themselves with their costumes and facial expressions .

Crosby rendered the difference between the two irrelevant. Where earlier recording artists had displayed strictly one-dimensional attitudes, Crosby not only perfected the fully rounded persona , but brought with it the technical ability of a true concert artist. Crosby projected with a majestic sense of intonation that afforded Tin Pan Alley the musical stature of European classics and a jazz influenced time that made him the dominant voice of both the Jazz age and the Swing era.

Crosby also elaborated on a further idea of Al Jolson 's, one that Frank Sinatra would ultimately extend: phrasing, or the art of making a song's lyric ring true. "I used to tell (Sinatra) over and over," said Tommy Dorsey , "there's only one singer you ought to listen to and his name is Crosby. All that matters to him is the words , and that's the only thing that ought to for you, too."

The greatest trick of Crosby's virtuosity was covering it up. It is often said that Crosby made his singing and acting "look easy," or as if it were no work at all: he simply was the character he portrayed, and his singing, being a direct extension of conversation, came just as naturally to him as talking, or even breathing. Journalist Donald Freeman said of Crosby, "There is only one Bing Crosby and "the time has come now to face the issue squarely" he happens to be that unique, awesome creature, an artist."

MORE INFO ON INGER STEVENS: This enigmatic Stockholm-born beauty had everything going for her, including a rapidly rising film and TV career. Yet on April 30, 1970, at only 35, Inger Stevens would become another tragic Hollywood statistic -- added proof that fame and fortune do not always lead to happiness. Over time, a curious fascination, and perhaps even a morbid interest, has developed over Ms. Stevens and her life. What exactly went wrong? A remote, paradoxical young lady with obvious personal problems, she disguised it all with a seemingly positive attitude, an incredibly healthy figure and a megawatt smile that wouldn't quit. Although very little information has been filtered out about Ms. Stevens and her secretive life over the years, William T. Patterson's eagerly-anticipated biography, "The Farmer's Daughter Remembered: The Biography of Actress Inger Stevens" (2000), finally put an end to much of the mystery. But not quite all. The book claims that a large amount of previously-published information about Ms. Stevens is either untrue or distorted.

A strong talent and consummate dramatic player of the late 50s and 60s, she was born Inger Stensland, the eldest of three children, of Swedish parentage. A painfully shy and sensitive child, she was initially drawn to acting as a girl after witnessing her father perform in amateur theater productions. Her rather bleak childhood could be directed at a mother who abandoned her family for another man when Inger was only 6. Her father moved to the States, remarried, and eventually summoned for Inger and a younger brother in 1944 to join him and his new bride. Family relations did not improve. As a teenager, she ran away from home and ended up in a burlesque chorus line only to be brought home by her father. After graduation and following some menial jobs here and there, she moved to New York and worked briefly as a model while studying at the Actors Studio. She broke into the business through TV commercials and summer stock, rising in the ingénue ranks as a guest in a number of weekly series.

Often viewed as the beautiful loner or lady of mystery, an innate sadness seemed to permeate many of her roles. Inger made her film debut at age 22 opposite Bing Crosby in Man on Fire (1957). Serious problems set in when Inger began falling in love with her co-stars. Broken affairs with Crosby, James Mason, her co-star in Cry Terror! (1958), Anthony Quinn, her director in Cecil B. DeMille's The Buccaneer (1958), and Harry Belafonte, her co-star in The World, the Flesh and the Devil (1959), left her frequently depressed and ultimately despondent. An almost-fatal New Year's day suicide attempt in 1959 led to an intense period of self-examination and a new resolve. A brief Broadway lead in "Roman Candle", an Emmy-nominated role opposite Peter Falk in The Dick Powell Theatre: Price of Tomatoes (1962), and popular appearances on such TV shows as Bonanza (1959), Twilight Zone (1959) and Route 66 (1960) paved the way to a popular series as "Katy Holstrum", the Swedish governess, in The Farmer's Daughter (1963). This brisk, change-of-pace comedy role earned her a Golden Globe award and Emmy nomination, and lasted three seasons.

Now officially a household name, Inger built up her momentum once again in films. A string of parts came her way within a three-year period including the sex comedy A Guide for the Married Man (1967) as roving eye husband Walter Matthau's unsuspecting wife; Clint Eastwood's first home-made American "spaghetti western", Hang 'Em High (1968); the crime drama, Madigan (1968) with Henry Fonda and Richard Widmark; the westerns Firecreek (1968) with Fonda again plus James Stewart, and 5 Card Stud (1968) opposite Dean Martin and Robert Mitchum; the political thriller House of Cards (1968) starring George Peppard and Orson Welles; and A Dream of Kings (1969) which reunited her with old flame Anthony Quinn. Although many of her co-starring roles seemed to be little more than love interest filler, Inger made a noticeable impression in the last movie mentioned, by far the most intense and complex of her film career. Adding to that mixture were a number of well-made TV mini-movies. On the minus side, she also resurrected the bad habit of pursuing affairs with her co-stars, which would include Dean Martin and, most notably, Burt Reynolds, her last.

In April of 1970, Inger signed on as a series lead in a crime whodunit The Most Deadly Game (1970) to be telecast that September. It never came to be. Less than a week later, she was found unconscious on the floor of her kitchen by her housekeeper and died en route to the hospital of acute barbiturate intoxication -- a lethal combination of drugs and alcohol. Yvette Mimieux replaced her in the short-lived series that fall. For all intents and purposes, Ms. Stevens' death was a suicide but Patterson's bio indicates other possibilities. Following her death, it came out in the tabloids that she had been secretly married to African-American Ike Jones since 1961. The couple was estranged at the time of her death.

This item is part of our in-store inventory from our shop which is located in the heart of Hollywood where we have been in business for the past 40 years!

MAN ON FIRE Lobby Card Set BING CROSBY Inger Stevens
Item #BMM0002413