$24.99


Great ORGINAL Script with MULTI-COLORED PAGES for the earlier ABC Movie of the Week Original films. This Script Is ALL ORIGINAL and was used at TV GUIDE for review by RICHARD HACK. It is for the 1975 drama,

Someone I Touched

A woman learns that her husband has been unfaithful and that he has acquired a venereal disease. Then she learns that, after years of trying, she is finally pregnant. When venereal disease infects a young woman, an expectant mother, and her husband, the question of who contacted it from whom arises. Glynnis O'Connor and Lenka Peterson -- daughter and mother in real life -- are daughter and mother in this odd-themed movie.

Director: Lou Antonio

Writers: James S. Henerson (teleplay), Pat Winter (story)

Stars: Cloris Leachman, James Olson, Glynnis O'Connor

Cast

Cloris Leachman ... Laura Hyatt
James Olson ... Sam Hyatt
Glynnis O'Connor ... Carrie
Andrew Robinson ... Frank Berlin (as Andy Robinson)
Allyn Ann McLerie ... Jean
Lenka Peterson ... Enid
Peggy Feury ... Dr. Klemperer
Fred Sadoff ... Phil
Les Lannom ... Frank
Kenneth Mars ... Paul Wrightwood
Cynthia Hoppenfeld ... Bess (as Cynthia Towne)
Richard Guthrie ... Eddie
John Dullaghan ... Second A.D.
Richmond Shepard ... Shopper
Bryan Englund ... Boy

This script Is the REVISED DRAFT from December 26, 1974. It was written by James Henerson, From an original idea by Patricia Winter. It is complete with 87 multi-colored pages. Great script if you obscure dramas.

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MORE INFO ON CLORIS LEACHMAN: Cloris Leachman (born April 30, 1926) is an American actress of stage, film and television. She has won eight Primetime Emmy Awards—more than any other performer—and one Daytime Emmy Award. She co-starred in the 1971 film The Last Picture Show. Leachman's longest running role was the nosy, self-centered and manipulative landlady Phyllis Lindstrom on the 1970s TV series Mary Tyler Moore, and later on the spinoff series, Phyllis. She also appeared in three Mel Brooks films, including Young Frankenstein. She had a regular role on the last two seasons of The Facts of Life portraying the character Beverly Ann Stickle. In recent years, she had a recurring role as Lois's mother Ida Gorski on Malcolm in the Middle. She also starred in the roast of Bob Saget in 2008. Leachman was a contestant on Season 7 (2008) of Dancing with the Stars, paired with Corky Ballas. At the age of 82, she was the oldest contestant to dance on the series.

Leachman was the grand marshal for the 2009 New Year's Day Tournament of Roses Parade and Rose Bowl Game in Pasadena, California. She presided over the 120th parade, the theme being "Hats Off to Entertainment", and the 95th Rose Bowl game. Leachman plays a supporting role in Raising Hope, a sitcom that premiered in the fall of 2010 on Fox. She will star with Tara Reid in The Fields, and with Colin Firth and Cameron Diaz in Gambit, a remake of a 1966 film. Leachman was born in Des Moines, Iowa, where she attended Roosevelt High School. She is the eldest of three daughters of Cloris (née Wallace) and Berkeley Claiborne "Buck" Leachman, who worked at the family-owned Leachman Lumber Company Her youngest sister, Claiborne Cary (1932–2010), was an actress and singer. Leachman's maternal grandmother was of Bohemian (Czech) descent.

Leachman majored in drama at Illinois State University and Northwestern University, where she was a member of Gamma Phi Beta and a classmate of future comic actor Paul Lynde. Leachman began appearing on television and in films shortly after competing in Miss America as Miss Chicago 1946. Before that she was very active at the Des Moines Playhouse, starring in many productions. After winning a scholarship in the beauty pageant, Leachman studied acting in New York City at the Actors Studio with Elia Kazan. It was there that she met the first love of her life, Andrew Morgan. Leachman was a replacement for character Nellie Forbush during the original run of Rodgers & Hammerstein's South Pacific. A few years later, she appeared in the Broadway-bound production of William Inge's Come Back, Little Sheba, but left the show before it reached Broadway when Katharine Hepburn asked her to co-star in a production of William Shakespeare's As You Like It.

Leachman appeared in many live television broadcasts in the 1950s, including such programs as Suspense and Studio One. She was also one of the Raisonette Girls in the 1960s. She made her feature film debut as an extra in the 1947 film Carnegie Hall, but had her first real role in Robert Aldrich's film noir classic Kiss Me Deadly, released in 1955. Leachman was several months pregnant during the filming, and appears in one scene running down a darkened highway wearing only a trenchcoat. A year later she appeared opposite Paul Newman and Lee Marvin in The Rack (1956). She appeared with Newman again, in a brief role as a prostitute in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969). She also appeared as "Judy" in Season one, Episode 2 of the TV series Adam-12.

She continued to work mainly in television, with appearances in Rawhide and in The Twilight Zone episode It's a Good Life. During this period, Leachman notably appeared on the popular anthology Alfred Hitchcock Presents in an engaging episode entitled "Premonition" opposite John Forsythe. Later in the decade, Leachman appeared as Ruth Martin, Timmy's adoptive mom, in the last half of season four (1957) of Lassie. Jon Provost ("Timmy Martin") said, "Cloris did not feel particularly challenged by the role. Basically, when she realized that all she'd be doing was baking cookies, she wanted out." She was replaced by June Lockhart in 1959. In 1959, she appeared in an episode of One Step Beyond titled "The Dark Room", where she portrayed an American photographer living in Paris. In 1960 she played Marilyn Parker, the roommate of Janice Rule's character, Elena Nardos, in the Checkmate episode The Mask of Vengeance.

Leachman has won numerous awards during her career. She won an Oscar for Best Supporting Actress in The Last Picture Show (1971), based on the bestselling book by Larry McMurtry. She played the high school gym teacher's wife, with whom Timothy Bottoms' character has an affair. Director Peter Bogdanovich had predicted to Leachman during production that she would win an Academy Award for her performance. The part was originally offered to Ellen Burstyn, who wanted another role in the film.

Leachman has also won a record-setting eight primetime and one daytime Emmy Awards and been nominated more than 20 times for her work in television over the years, most notably as the character of neighbor/landlady/nosy friend Phyllis Lindstrom on The Mary Tyler Moore Show. The character was a recurring character on the program for five years and was subsequently featured in a spinoff series, Phyllis (1975–1977), for which Leachman garnered a Golden Globe award. The series ran for two seasons. Its cancellation was partly due to the deaths of three regular or recurring cast members during its brief run: Barbara Colby, Judith Lowry and Burt Mustin.

In 1977, she guest starred on The Muppet Show, episode 2.24 (48th episode). In 1978, she won the Sarah Siddons Award for her work in Chicago theatre. In 1987 she hosted the VHS releases of Schoolhouse Rock. In 1986, Leachman returned to television, replacing Charlotte Rae's character Edna Garrett as the den mother on The Facts of Life. Leachman's role, as Edna's sister, Beverly Ann Stickle, could not save the long-running series, and it was canceled two years later.

She has voice-acted in numerous animated films, including My Little Pony: The Movie as the evil witch mother from the Volcano of Gloom, The Iron Giant, and most notably as the voice of the cantankerous sky pirate Dola in Hayao Miyazaki's 1986 feature Castle in the Sky. Dubbed by Disney in 1998, Leachman's performance in this film received nearly unanimous praise. Leachman played embittered, greedy, Slavic Canadian "Grandma Ida" on the Fox sitcom Malcolm in the Middle, for which she won two Emmy Awards, both for Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series (once in 2002, then again in 2006). She was nominated for playing that same character for six consecutive years.

Later television credits include the successful Lifetime Television miniseries Beach Girls with Rob Lowe and Julia Ormond. Leachman was nominated for a SAG Award for her role as the wine-soaked, former jazz singer and grandmother Evelyn in the Sony feature Spanglish opposite Adam Sandler and Tea Leoni. She had replaced an ailing Anne Bancroft in the role. The film reunited her with her The Mary Tyler Moore Show writer-producer-director James L. Brooks. That same year she appeared with Sandler again, in the remake of The Longest Yard. She also appeared in Kurt Russell comedy Sky High as the school nurse with X-ray vision. In 2005, she guest starred as Charlie Harper's neighbor Norma in an episode (#3.9 "Madame and Her Special Friend") of Two and a Half Men.

In 2006, Leachman's performance alongside Sir Ben Kingsley and Annette Bening in the HBO special Mrs. Harris earned her an Emmy nomination for outstanding supporting actress in a miniseries or TV movie as well as an SAG Award nomination for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Television Movie or Miniseries. On May 14, 2006, she was awarded an honorary Doctorate in Fine Arts from Drake University. Leachman was inducted into the Television Academy Hall of Fame in 2011.

In 2011, Leachman was ranked #23 on the TV Guide Network special, Funniest Women on TV.

Leachman has appeared in three Mel Brooks films. She played Frau Blücher in Young Frankenstein (1974), in which the mere mention of her character's name elicits the loud neighing of horses (an homage to a cinematic villain stereotype) She also appeared in High Anxiety (1977) as the demented villainess, psychiatric nurse Charlotte Diesel, and as Madame Defarge in the segment of History of the World: Part I (1981) which parodied Dickens' A Tale of Two Cities.

She auditioned for a chance to revive her role from Young Frankenstein in the 2007 Broadway production opposite Megan Mullally (replacing formerly cast Kristin Chenoweth) and Roger Bart. However, Andrea Martin was cast in the role. Mel Brooks was quoted as saying that Leachman, at 81, was too old for the role. "We don't want her to die on stage", he told columnist Army Archerd, at which Leachman took umbrage. However, due to Leachman's success on Dancing with the Stars, Brooks reportedly asked her to reprise her role as Frau Blücher in the Broadway production of Young Frankenstein after Beth Leavel, who had succeeded Martin.] The Broadway production closed before this could be realized.

Leachman was a contestant on the seventh season of Dancing with the Stars, and was paired with Corky Ballas, the oldest of the professionals. Leachman is the oldest person to compete on the show to date.

From 1953 to 1979, Leachman was married to Hollywood impresario George Englund. Leachman's former mother-in-law was character actress Mabel Albertson, best known for playing Samantha Stevens's bewildered mother-in-law on Bewitched. The marriage produced five children: Bryan (died 1986), Morgan, Adam, Dinah and George Englund, Jr. Some of them are in show business. Her son Morgan played Dylan on Guiding Light throughout the 1980s and early 1990s.

Leachman's son Bryan died from a drug overdose on February 25, 1986. Some reports state that it was an overdose of ulcer medication, while others, such as in the Lifetime Television program Intimate Portrait: Cloris Leachman (in which Leachman participated), state that it was from cocaine. In an interview by Cal Fussman in Esquire, Jan. 2009, Leachman stated, "I've been so relieved and so grateful to not have a god to believe in." She called herself an agnostic in an interview with Grandparents magazine. In 2012, Leachman said she was an atheist.

The Englunds were Bel Air neighbors of Judy Garland and Sid Luft, and of their children, Lorna and Joey Luft, during the early 1960s. Lorna Luft states in her memoir Me and My Shadows: A Family Memoir that Leachman was "the kind of mom I'd only seen on TV". Knowing of the turmoil at the Garland home but never mentioning it, Leachman prepared meals for Judy's children and made them feel welcome whenever they needed a place to stay.

Leachman was also a friend of Marlon Brando, whom she met while studying under Elia Kazan in the 1950s. She introduced him to her husband, who became close to Brando as well, directing him in The Ugly American and writing a memoir about their friendship called Marlon Brando: The Way It's Never Been Done Before (2005).

In a parody of the famous Demi Moore Vanity Fair magazine cover photo, Leachman posed "au naturel" on the cover of Alternative Medicine Digest (issue 15, 1997) body-painted with images of fruit. A vegetarian, Leachman also posed clad only in lettuce for a 2009 PETA advertisement.

Leachman's autobiography Cloris: My Autobiography was published in March 2009. She wrote the bestselling book with her former husband, George Englund.

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MORE INFO ON ROBERT CULP: Tall, slim and exceedingly good-looking American leading man Robert Culp, a former cartoonist in his teen years, appeared off-Broadwayin the 1950s before settling into polished, clean-cut film leads and "other man" supports a decade later. Hitting the popular TV boards in the hip, racially ground-breaking espionage program "I Spy" (1965), he made a slick (but never smarmy), sardonic name for himself during his over five-decade career with his sly humor, casual banter and tongue-and-cheek sexiness. Though he had the requisite looks and smooth, manly appeal (not to mention acting talent) for superstardom, a cool but cynical and somewhat detached persona may have prevented him from attaining it full-out.

He was born Robert Martin Culp on August 16, 1930, in Oakland California. The son of attorney Crozie Culp and his wife, Bethel Collins, who was employed at a Berkeley chemical company, he offset his only-child loneliness by playacting in local theater productions. Culp also showed a talent for art while young and earned money as a cartoonist for Bay Area magazines and newspapers in high school, but the fascination with becoming an actor proved much stronger. He attended Berkeley High School and graduated in 1947. The athletically-inclined Culp dominated at track and field events and, as a result, earned athletic scholarships to six different universities. He selected the relatively minor College of the Pacific in Stockton, California primarily because of its active theater department. Transferring to various other colleges of higher learning (including San Francisco State in 1949), he never earned a degree. After performing in some theatre in the San Francisco area, he moved to Seattle and then New York in 1951.

Studying under famed teacher Herbert Berghofand supporting himself during this time teaching speech and phonetics, Bob eventually found work on the theatre scene, making his 1963 Broadwaydebut (as Robert M. Culp) in "The Prescott Proposals" with Katharine Cornell. He eventually returned to Broadwaywith "Diary of a Scoundrel" starring Blanche Yurka andRoddy McDowall in 1956 and with a strong role in "A Clearing in the Woods" (alongsideKim Stanley) a year later. He earned an off-BroadwayObie Award for his very fine work in "He Who Gets Slapped" in 1956, and also appeared in the plays "Daily Life" and "Easter".

Gracing a few live-TV dramas during his New York days, he returned to his native California for his first major TV role. It was an auspicious one as post-Civil War Texas Ranger "Hoby Gilman" in the western series "Trackdown"(1957). He earned widespread attention in the series that based many of its stories from actual Texas Ranger files, and the show itself received the official approval not only of the Rangers themselves but by the State of Texas. The series led to a CBS spin-off of its own: "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958), which made a TV star out of Steve McQueen.

From there, Culp guested on a number of series dramas: "Bonanza"(1959), "The Rifleman"(1958), "Rawhide"(1959), "The Detectives Starring Robert Taylor" (1959), "Ben Casey"(1961), "The Outer Limits" (1963), "Naked City"(1958) and "Combat!"(1962). He also starred in the two-part Disney family-styled program "Sammy the Way Out Seal" (1962), which was subsequently released as a feature in Europe. He and Patricia Barryplayed the hapless parents of precocious Bill Mumy and Michael McGreeveywhose "adopted" pet animal unleashes major chaos in their suburban neighborhood.

During this time, Bob began to seek lead and supporting work in films. Despite his co-starring with Cliff Robertson, Rod Taylor and the very perky Jane Fonda (as her straight-laced boyfriend) in the sparkling Broadway-based sexcapade Sunday in New York (1963); playing Robertson's naval mate in the popular John F. Kennedybiopic PT 109 (1963); recreating the legendary "Wild Bill" Hickok in the western tale The Raiders(1963); and heading up the adventurous cast of the Ivan Tors' African yarn Rhino! (1964) (which included Harry Guardinoand the very fetching British import Shirley Eaton), Culp wasn't able to make a serious dent in the medium.

TV remained his best arena and gave him more lucrative offers, professionally. It rewarded him quite richly in 1965 with the debonair series lead "Kelly Robinson", a jet-setting, pro-circuit tennis player who leads a double life as an international secret agent in "I Spy" (1965). Running three seasons, Culp co-starred with fellow secret agent Bill Cosby, who, as "Alexander Scott", posed as Culp's tennis trainer. The role was tailor-made for the suave, Ivy-League-looking actor. He looked effortlessly cool posing in sunglasses amid the posh continental settings and remained handsomely unflinching in the face of danger. It was the first U.S. prime-time network drama to feature an African-American actor in a full-out starring role and the relationship between the two meshed perfectly and charismatically on screen. Both were nominated for acting Emmys in all three of its seasons, with Cosby coming out the victor each time. Filmed on location in such cities as Hong Kong, Acapulco and Tokyo, Culp also wrote and directed certain episodes of the show He also met his third wife, the gorgeous Eurasian actress France Nuyen, while on the set. They married in 1967 but divorced three years later. At this stage, the actor already had four children (by second wife, sometime actress Nancy Ashe).

Following the series' demise, Culp took on perhaps his most-famous and controversial film role as Natalie Wood's husband "Bob" in the titillating but ultimately teasing "flower power" era film Bob & Carol& Ted & Alice (1969), with Elliott Gould andDyan Cannon as the other-half couple who examine the late 60s "free love" idea of wife-swapping. The film was nominated for four Academy Awards (two went to supporting actors Gould and Cannon). The movie did not reignite Culp's popularity on the large screen, but it did lead to his rather strange pairing with buxom Raquel Welch in the violent-edged western Hannie Caulder(1971) and a reunion with his "I Spy" (1965) pal Cosby in the far-more entertaining Hickey & Boggs (1972), which reestablished their great tongue-in-cheek rapport as two weary-eyed private eyes. Culp also directed the film while his real-life wife, actress Sheila Sullivan, played his screen wife as well.

The late 1970s produced a flood of routine mini-movies and B-pictures, the latter including Inside Out(1975), Sky Riders(1976), Breaking Point(1976), The Great Scout& Cathouse Thursday (1976), Flood! (1976) (TV), Goldengirl(1979) and Hot Rod (1979) (TV). While he remained a sturdy and standard presence in such mini-movies as Houston, We've Got a Problem (1974) (TV), Spectre (1977) (TV) and Calendar Girl Murders (1984) (TV), his better TV-movie roles were in A Cold Night's Death (1973) (TV), Outrage (1973) (TV), A Cry for Help(1975) (TV) and as "Lyle Pettyjohn" in the acclaimed mini-series sequel "Roots: The Next Generations" (1979).

Bob returned to series TV as stern "CIA Chief Bill Maxwell", whose job was to protect handsome Robert Redfordlookalike William Katt, who starred as an ersatz "The Greatest American Hero" (1981). The show lasted three seasons. Other series guest spots, both comedic and dramatic, included "Hotel" (1983), "Highway to Heaven" (1984), "The Golden Girls" (1985) and an episode of his old buddy's show "The Cosby Show"(1984). He was also a guest murderer in three of the "Columbo" episodes. Although he was relegated to appearing in such film fodder as Turk 182!(1985), Big Bad Mama II(1987) and Pucker Up and Bark Like a Dog (1990), the 1990s offered him one of his best film roles in years as the ill-fated President in the Denzel Washington/Julia Robertspolitical thriller The Pelican Brief (1993). A year later, he again reteamed with Cosby in the TV-movie I Spy Returns(1994) (TV).

Culp became very active in the 1960s Civil Rights movement and later became a prominent face in local civic causes, joining in a lawsuit to cease construction of an elephant exhibit at the Los Angeles Zoo and accusing officials there of mistreatment. In the long run, however, the construction was given the green light. Culp also married a fifth time to Candace Faulkner and, by her, had daughter Samantha Culp in 1982. Older sons Jason Culp (born 1961) and Joseph Culp (born 1963) became actors, while another son, Joshua Culp (born 1958), entered the visual effects field. Daughter Rachel, an outr? clothing designer for rock stars, was born in 1964.

In later years, Culp could be seen occasionally as Ray Romano's father-in-law on the hugely popular "Everybody Loves Raymond" (1996). His last film, the family drama The Assignment(2010), was unreleased at the time of his death. On March 24, 2010, the 79-year-old Culp collapsed from an apparent heart attack while walking near the lower entrance to Runyon Canyon Park, a popular hiking area in the Hollywood Hills. Found by a hiker, Culp was transported to a nearby hospital where he died from the head injuries he sustained in the fall. Five grandchildren also survive.

MORE INFO ON ELI WALLACH:

Eli Herschel Wallach (born December 7, 1915) is an American film, television and stage actor who gained fame in the late 1950s. For his performance as Silva Vacarro in Baby Doll he won a BAFTA Award for Best Newcomer and a Golden Globe nomination. Among his most famous roles are Tuco in The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966) and Calvera in The Magnificent Seven. Other portrayals include Don Altobello in The Godfather Part III, Cotton Weinberger in The Two Jakes, and Arthur Abbott in The Holiday. He has remained active well into his nineties, with roles in recent movies such as Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps and The Ghost Writer.

Wallach has received BAFTA Awards, Tony Awards and Emmy Awards for his work. He received an Honorary Academy Award at the 2nd Annual Governors Awards, presented on November 13, 2010. Wallach was born in Red Hook, Brooklyn at 166 Union St., the son of Polish Jewish immigrants Bertha (née Schorr) and Abraham Wallach. They were the only Jewish family in an otherwise predominantly Italian American neighborhood. His parents owned "Bertha's", a candy store. Wallach graduated in 1936 from the University of Texas at Austin with a degree in history and in 1938 received a masters degree in education from the City College of New York. He gained his first Method experience at the Neighborhood Playhouse. While attending the University of Texas Wallach performed in a play with fellow students Ann Sheridan and Walter Cronkite.

Wallach served as a United States Army staff sergeant in a military hospital in Hawaii during World War II. He was soon sent to Officer Candidate School (OCS) in Abilene, Texas, to train as a medical administrative officer. He graduated as a Second Lieutenant and was sent to Madison Barracks in upstate New York. He was promptly shipped to Casablanca and, later in the war, to France. It was there that a superior discovered his acting history and asked him to form a show for the patients. He and other members from his unit wrote a play called Is This the Army?, which was inspired by Irving Berlin's This is the Army. In the comedic play, Wallach and the other men clowned around as various dictators, with Wallach portraying Adolf Hitler, the leader of Nazi Germany.

Wallach took classes in acting at the Dramatic Workshop of the New School in New York with the influential German director Erwin Piscator. Wallach made his Broadway debut in 1945 and won a Tony Award in 1951 for his performance in the Tennessee Williams play The Rose Tattoo. Additional theater credits include Mister Roberts, The Teahouse of the August Moon, Camino Real, Major Barbara, Luv, and Staircase, co-starring Milo O'Shea, which was a serious depiction of an aging homosexual couple. He also played a role in a tour of Antony and Cleopatra, produced by the actress Katharine Cornell in 1946. He last starred on stage as the title character in Visiting Mr. Green.

Wallach's film debut was in Elia Kazan's controversial Baby Doll, and he went on to a prolific career in films, although rarely in a starring role. Other early films include The Lineup, The Misfits, The Magnificent Seven (he portrayed the Mexican bandit Calvera), Lord Jim as the General, a comic role in How to Steal a Million (the latter two with Peter O'Toole), and perhaps most famously, as Tuco (the 'Ugly') in Sergio Leone's The Good, the Bad and the Ugly. After the latter's success, Wallach appeared in several other "Spaghetti Westerns", including Ace High with Terence Hill and Bud Spencer.

Wallach is central to one of the most infamous show business legends. In 1953 he was cast as Angelo Maggio in the movie From Here to Eternity but was abruptly replaced by Frank Sinatra before filming began. Sinatra went on to win an Oscar for the performance and revived his career. Sinatra used pressure from his underworld connections to get the part. That inspired a similar incident depicted in the classic 1972 film The Godfather. To spare Sinatra embarrassment, Wallach says he turned down the role to appear in a Tennessee Williams play: "Whenever Sinatra saw me, he'd say, 'Hello, you crazy actor!'"

In 2006, Wallach made a guest appearance on the NBC show Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip, playing a former writer who was blacklisted in the 1950s. His character was a writer on The Philco Comedy Hour, a show that aired on a fictional NBS network. This is a reference to The Philco Television Playhouse, in several episodes of which Wallach actually appeared in 1955. Wallach earned a 2007 Emmy nomination for his work on the show.

Before accepting a role as a villain in Leone's Once Upon a Time in the West, Henry Fonda called Wallach and asked "What the hell does he [Leone] know about the West?" Wallach assured Fonda he would be pleasantly surprised if he accepted the role. After the film's success, Fonda called Wallach back to thank him.

Wallach and Leone, though having built a good relationship during shooting The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, had a falling-out later on. Leone had asked Wallach to play a role in his upcoming film, A Fistful of Dynamite, but the actor explained he had a scheduling conflict. After much pleading Wallach finally relented and turned down the other offer and waited for Leone to raise enough Hollywood money for the picture. However, the studio Leone went to had an actor, Rod Steiger, with one more picture in his studio contract and the studio announced that Leone would have to use him if they were to put up any financing. Leone then called to apologize to Wallach, who remained dumbstruck on the other end of the line. After even refusing to give Wallach a token payment for losing out on two jobs, the actor said, "I'll sue you"—to which Leone replied, "Get in line", and slammed down the phone. In his autobiography, Wallach relates the incident as regrettably being the final time the two spoke to one another. On February 27, 2011, he received an Honorary Academy Award for his contribution to the film industry.

Wallach played Mr. Freeze in the 1960s Batman television series. He wrote in his autobiography that he received more fan mail about his role as Mr. Freeze than about all of his other roles combined.

Preceded by

Otto Preminger Vincent Fries/Mr. Freeze Actor

29–30 March 1967 Succeeded by

Arnold Schwarzenegger

Eli Wallach has been married to stage actress Anne Jackson (born 1926) since March 5, 1948, and they have three children: Peter (born 1951), Roberta (born 1955) Katherine (born 1958): Roberta had an acting experience as a mentally disturbed teenager in Paul Zindel's The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds.

In 2005, Wallach released his autobiography The Good, the Bad and Me: In My Anecdotage. In this tome, Wallach wrote about his most famous role as Tuco in The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, commenting that he did not realize he was going to be "blessed" with that title until he saw the film. He remarked that it was an honor to work with Clint Eastwood, whom he praised for his professionalism. Wallach also mentioned that director Sergio Leone was notoriously careless regarding the safety of his actors during dangerous scenes. It was during filming that Wallach accidentally drank from a bottle of acid that a film technician had carelessly placed next to his soda bottle. He spat it out immediately, but was furious because his vocal cords could have been damaged if he had swallowed any of it. Leone gave him some milk to wash his mouth out with and apologized for the incident, but also commented that accidents do happen.

Wallach lost sight in his left eye as the result of a stroke. According to his autobiography, the incident occurred "some years ago".

A. O. Scott, a film critic for the New York Times, is his great-nephew.

MORE INFO ON GLYNNIS O'CONNOR: New York-born actress Glynnis O'Connor was primed for acting right from the beginning. Her father is producer "Daniel O'Connor" and her mother, Lenka Peterson, an actress who would later play minor roles in TV-movies with her. Brother is Darren O'Connor, who also has appeared successfully on film and TV. In her late teens, she was featured on the daytime soap "As the World Turns" (1956) and, soon after, starred in her own short-lived prime-time series, "Sons and Daughters" (1974), a soapy drama about young love in the 1950s, co-starring Gary Frank, from the TV series "Family" (1976). A graduate of the State University of New York, Glynnis had an immediate impact portraying sensitive, fretful young romantics and definitely hit her stride in her early adult career with the poignant film Jeremy (1973) with Robby Benson as two docile teens who fall in love in New York City. She reunited with Benson in the popular backwoods love story Ode to Billy Joe (1976), a take-off on the Bobbie Gentry 60s pop/folk hit which offered an interesting sexual hypothesis as to why the troubled title character "jumped off the Talahatchie Bridge" and in the excellent TV stage production of "Our Town" in which she played "Emily Webb" to Benson's "George Gibbs". Along the way, she further tugged at TV viewer's heartstrings in "Sons and Daughters: Senior Year (#1.0)" (1974), All Together Now (1975) (TV) and The Boy in the Plastic Bubble (1976) (TV) starring up-and-coming John Travolta. She hooked up with Jan-Michael Vincent in another rural romance in the film Baby Blue Marine (1976) and, movingly, played ill-fated tennis champion "Maureen Connolly" in Little Mo (1978) (TV) on the small screen. With all this diversity displayed, Glynnis still lacked that certain spark that could take her into the front ranks. Her name and off-camera personality somehow never meshed with the movie-going public despite her continued excellence into the 80s with the Canadian film Melanie (1982), as an uneducated woman trying to regain custody of her son, and the intensely dramatic TV-movie Why Me? (1984) (TV) as an Air Force nurse forced to readjust into society after a shockingly disfiguring car accident. Following this, Glynnis' career went into a rather swift decline, her billing falling further and further down the credits list. Despite this career setback, Glynnis has managed to persevere, and can still be seen sporadically on both film and TV.

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SOMEONE I TOUCHED Original SCRIPT Cloris Leachman
Item #BMM0001225