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This is an ORIGINAL 20 page Theater PROGRAM, measuring 8-1/2" x 12" slight corner bend featuring ANNE JEFFREYS, KEITH ANDES, MARC PLATT, JULIE WILSON and BENNY BAKER.

THIS PROGRAM is a souvenier program for the stage production of

KISS ME KATE

This Program features great information on the cast and photos, info on the lyricists, authors, and composers. Nice OLD THEATRE Program!!

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Kiss Me, Kate is a musical with music and lyrics by Cole Porter. The story involves the production of a musical version of William Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew and the conflict on and off-stage between Fred Graham, the show's director, producer, and star, and his leading lady, his ex-wife Lilli Vanessi. A secondary romance concerns Lois Lane, the actress playing Bianca, and her gambler boyfriend, Bill, who runs afoul with some gangsters. The original production starred Alfred Drake, Patricia Morison, Lisa Kirk and Harold Lang and won the Tony-Award.

Kiss Me, Kate was Porter's response to Rodgers and Hammerstein's Oklahoma! and other integrated musicals; it was the first show he wrote in which the music and lyrics were firmly connected to the script, and it proved to be his biggest hit and the only one of his shows to run for more than 1,000 performances on Broadway. In 1949, it won the first Tony Award presented for Best Musical.

After a 3½-week pre-Broadway tryout at the Shubert Theatre in Philadelphia starting December 2, 1948, the original Broadway production opened on December 30, 1948, at the New Century Theatre, where it ran for nineteen months before transferring to the Shubert, for a total run of 1,077 performances. Directed by John C. Wilson with choreography by Hanya Holm, the original cast included Alfred Drake, Patricia Morison, Lisa Kirk, Harold Lang, Charles Wood and Harry Clark.

The original West End production opened on March 8, 1951 at the Coliseum Theatre, and ran for 400 performances. Directed by Sam Spewack with choreography again by Holm, this production starred Patricia Morison, Bill Johnson, Adelaide Hall and Julie Wilson. A London revival opened in December 1970 at the London Coliseum, in a production by the Sadler's Wells Opera. The cast featured Emile Belcourt (Petruchio), Judith Bruce, Eric Shilling, Ann Howard (Kate), Francis Egerton, Robert Lloyd, with direction by Peter Coe and choreography by Sheila O'Neill. Coe did a translation for British audiences, including having "a tea wagon", and included "traditional English music hall jokes". This revival had a "brief run", according to the Encyclopedia of the Musical Theatre.

A Broadway revival opened at the Martin Beck Theatre on November 18, 1999 and closed on December 30, 2001 after 881 performances and 28 previews. Directed by Michael Blakemore and choreographed by Kathleen Marshall and Rob Ashford, the opening night cast included Marin Mazzie, Brian Stokes Mitchell, Amy Spanger, Michael Berresse, Ron Holgate, Lee Wilkof, and Michael Mulheren. This production won the Tony Awards for Best Revival of a Musical and Best Actor in a Musical for Mitchell; Marin Mazzie received a Tony nomination for Best Actress in a Musical, and Michael Berresse, Lee Wilkof and Michael Mulheren received Tony nominations for Best Featured Actor in a Musical.

The Italian version opened at the Teatro delle Celebrazioni in Bologna on December 31, 2007.

A Canadian production opened on June 8, 2010, in Stratford, Ontario. Kiss Me, Kate had also been produced in Canada as the choice for a musical at the annual Shaw Festival at Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, in the early 1990s.

The Swiss-German version of the show opened on December 30, 2010, in Zentrum Bühne Bottighofen, Switzerland and had 14 successful performances.

The Glasgow Minerva Club performed the show for 6 performances in the Mitchell Theatre in November 2011.

A new production of the German version of the show opened on April 27, 2012 in Dresden (Staatsoperette / State Operetta Theatre).

It is also part of the repertoire in 2013.

In January 2013, to celebrate the 100th anniversary of Porter's graduation from Yale University, a staged reading of the show took place at Yale's University Theater in New Haven, Connecticut, featuring a cast, crew, and full orchestra made entirely of Yale students and alumni.

The cast of a musical version of William Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew is rehearsing for the opening of the show that evening ("Another Op'nin', Another Show"). Egotistical Fred Graham is the director and producer and is starring as Petruchio, and his movie-star ex-wife, Lilli Vanessi, is playing Katherine. The two seem to be constantly arguing, and Lilli is particularly angry that Fred is pursuing the sexy young actress Lois Lane, who is playing Bianca. After the rehearsal, Lois's boyfriend Bill appears; he is playing Lucentio, but he missed the rehearsal because he was gambling. He tells her that he signed a $10,000 IOU in Fred's name, and Lois reprimands him ("Why Can't You Behave").

Before the opening, Fred and Lilli meet backstage, and Lilli shows off her engagement ring from Washington insider Harrison Howell, reminding Fred that it's the anniversary of their divorce. They recall the operetta in which they met, which included "Wunderbar", a Viennese waltz; they end up fondly reminiscing and singing and dancing. Two gangsters show up to collect the $10,000 IOU, and Fred replies that he never signed it. The gangsters obligingly say they will give him time to remember it and will return later. In her dressing room, Lilli receives flowers from Fred, and she declares that she is still "So In Love" with him. Fred tries to keep Lilli from reading the card that came with the flowers, which reveals that he really intended them for Lois. However, Lilli takes the card with her onstage, saying she will read it later.

The show begins ("We Open in Venice"). Baptista, Katherine and Bianca's father, will not allow his younger daughter Bianca to marry until his older daughter Katherine is married. However, she is shrewish and ill-tempered, and no man desires to marry her. Three suitors - Lucentio, Hortensio, and Gremio - try to woo Bianca, and she says that she would marry any of them ("Tom, Dick, or Harry"). Petruchio, a friend of Lucentio, expresses a desire to marry into wealth ("I've Come to Wive it Wealthily in Padua"). The suitors hatch a plan for him to marry Kate, as Baptista is rich. Kate, however, has no intentions of getting married ("I Hate Men"). Petruchio attempts to woo her ("Were Thine That Special Face"). Offstage, Lilli has an opportunity to read the card. She walks on stage off-cue and begins hitting Fred, who, along with the other actors, tries to remain in character as Baptista gives Petruchio permission to marry Kate. Lilli continues to strike Fred, and he ends up spanking her. Offstage, Lilli furiously declares she is leaving the show. However, the gangsters have reappared, and Fred tells them that if Lilli quits, he'll have to close the show and won't be able to pay them the $10,000. The gangsters force her to stay at gunpoint. Back onstage, Bianca and Lucentio dance while the chorus performs "We Sing of Love", covering a scene change. The curtain opens, revealing the exterior of a church; Petruchio and Kate have just been married, and they exit the church; the gangsters, dressed in Shakespearean costume, are onstage to make sure that Lilli stays. Petruchio implores for Kate to kiss him, and she refuses. He lifts her over his shoulder and carries her offstage while she pummels his shoulder with her fists ("Kiss Me Kate").

Act II

During the show's intermission, the cast and crew relax in the alley behind the theater. Paul (Fred's assistant), along with a couple other crew members, lament that it's "Too Darn Hot" to meet their lovers that night. The play continues, and Petruchio tries to 'tame' Katherine and mourns for his now-lost bachelor life (Where Is the Life That Late I Led?). Off-stage, Lilli's fiancé Harrison Howell is looking for Lilli. He runs into Lois, and she recognizes him as a former lover but promises not to tell Lilli. Bill is shocked to overhear this, but Lois tells him that even if she is involved with other men, she is faithful to him in her own way ("Always True To You In My Fashion"). Lilli tries to explain to Howell that she is being forced to stay at the theatre by the gangsters, but Howell doesn't believe her and wants to discuss wedding plans. Fred insidiously points out how boring Lilli's life with Howell will be compared to the theatre. Bill sings a love song he has written for Lois ("Bianca").

The gangsters discover that their boss has been killed, so the IOU is no longer valid. Lilli leaves—without Howell—as Fred unsuccessfully tries to convince her to stay ("So in Love" (Reprise)). The gangsters get caught on stage and improvise a tribute to Shakespeare in which they explain that knowing Shakespeare is the key to romance ("Brush Up Your Shakespeare"). The company prepares for the conclusion of the play, the wedding of Bianca and Lucentio, even though they are now missing one of the main characters. However, just in time for Katherine's final speech, Lilli arrives onstage ("I Am Ashamed That Women Are So Simple"). Fred and Lilli wordlessly reconcile on stage, and the play ends ("Kiss Me Kate" (Finale)) with them, as well as Bill and Lois, kissing passionately.

Song list

Act I

"Another Op'nin', Another Show" "?? Hattie and Company

"Why Can't You Behave?" – Lois Lane and Bill Calhoun

"Wunderbar" – Fred Graham and Lilli Vanessi

"So in Love" – Lilli Vanessi

"We Open in Venice" – Fred Graham, Lilli Vanessi, Lois Lane and Bill Calhoun

"Tom, Dick or Harry" – Bianca, Lucentio, Gremio and Hortensio

"I've Come to Wive it Wealthily in Padua" – Fred Graham and The Men

"I Hate Men" – Lilli Vanessi

"Were Thine That Special Face" – Fred Graham

"We Sing of Love (Cantiamo D'Amore)" – Lois Lane, Bill Calhoun and Ensemble

"Kiss Me, Kate" – Fred Graham, Lili Vanessi and Ensemble

MORE INFO ON ANNE JEFFREYS: The ever-lovely, poised and vivacious blonde Anne Jeffreys was born Anne Carmichael in 1923 in Goldsboro, North Carolina. Firmly managed by her mother, she trained in voice at a fairly early age and received her first break in the entertainment field after signing with the John Robert Powers agency in New York as a junior model. In the interim, she prepared herself for an operatic career and made her in a production of "La Boheme" in 1940. The following year, however, Anne won a role in the musical review "Fun for the Money" that was to be staged in Hollywood. This, in turn, led to her first movie role in the tuneful Rodgers & Hart adaptation of (1942) starring her singing idols and in their last cinematic pairing.

Put under contract respectively by Republic then RKO studios, Anne was utilized as a plucky heroine in a flux of 40s "B" westerns and crimers opposite such stalwarts as and . Also among her roles was the part of Tess Trueheart in the Dick Tracy series with as the steel-jawed hero, and a co-star role opposite in the war-era musical (1944). None of these, however, were able to propel her into the "A" ranks and her film career quickly dissipated by the end of the 40s. In the meantime, Anne continued to prod her vocal skills with symphonic and stage appearances including "Tosca" at the Brooklyn Opera House, 's "Street Scene" and the musical "My Romance".

Divorced in 1949, Anne met handsome actor during an extended run (887 performances) of "Kiss Me Kate" on . She and Sterling married in 1951 and had three sons. In an attempt to revive their flagging careers, the singing couple toured nighteries and hotels in the early 1950s with a highly successful club act. This led to them being cast as sly, engagingly cavalier spirits in the classic (1953) sitcom. Anne played Marion Kirby ("the ghostess with the mostest") alongside Sterling's dapper husband George. Successfully, undertaking the ectoplasmic roles originated on film by and , the two were an absolute hit as the party-hearty ghosts who reclaim their home to the dismay of current owner .

Anne and Robert weren't able to recreate that same kind of magic when they subsequently co-starred in the short-lived series (1958). In the 1960s Anne semi-retired to raise her family, but occasionally took on musical leads ("Camelot", "The King and I") both on and in regional productions. She later returned full time to TV and became known for her chic, gregarious, sometimes double-dealing matrons on soap operas ( (1969) and (1972)). She was nominated for a Golden Globe for her supporting work in (1972) adventure series, and appeared occasionally as the mother of on (1989).

Unlike her husband, who retired decades ago (he died in 2006), Anne remains a tireless performer past age 80. Still quite a beauty, she has been recognized over the years for her civic and humanitarian efforts.

This item is part of our in-store inventory from our shop which is located in the heart of Hollywood where we have been in business for the past 40 years!

KISS ME KATE Original Theatre Program ANNE JEFFREYS
Item #BMM0001027