$19.99


This is an ORIGINAL Copy Script with a studio handwritten Cover. This copy script is an EARLY draft dated August 10, 1979. This was presented to the studio to decide to film the 1980 Thriller

The First Deadly Sin

A police inspector, nearing retirement, tracks a serial killer who is terrorizing New York. A serial killer is stalking New York. Inspector Edward X. Delaney is an NYPD detective, nearing retirement, who is trying to put together the pieces of the case. Are the victims somehow linked? What does the brutal method of death signify?

Director: Brian G. Hutton

Writers: Mann Rubin (screenplay), Lawrence Sanders (novel)

Stars: Frank Sinatra, Faye Dunaway, David Dukes

Cast

Frank Sinatra ... Edward Delaney
Faye Dunaway ... Barbara Delaney
David Dukes ... Daniel Blank
George Coe ... Dr. Bernardi
Brenda Vaccaro ... Monica Gilbert
Martin Gabel ... Christopher Langley
Anthony Zerbe ... Captain Broughton
James Whitmore ... Dr. Sanford Ferguson
Joe Spinell ... Charles Lipsky
Anna Navarro ... Sunny Jordeen
Jeffrey DeMunn ... Sergeant Fernandez Correlli
John Devaney ... John Rogers
Robert Weil ... Sol Appel
Hugh Hurd ... Ben Johnson
Jon DeVries ... Calvin Samtell

It is complete with 125 pages. Great Script to read if you loved this film!

Shop with confidence! This is part of our in-store inventory from our shop which is has been located in the heart of Hollywood where we have been in business for the past 40 years!

MORE INFO ON FRANK SINATRA: Growing up on the gritty streets of Hoboken, New Jersey, made Frank Sinatra determined to work hard to get ahead. Starting out as a saloon singer in musty little dives (he carried his own P.A. system), he eventually got work as a band singer, first with The Hoboken Four, then with Harry James and then Tommy Dorsey. With the help of George Evans (Sinatra's genius press agent), his image was shaped into that of a street thug and punk who was saved by his first wife, Nancy Barbato. In 1942 he started his solo career, instantly finding fame as the king of the bobbysoxers--the young women and girls who were his fans--and becoming the most popular singer of the era among teenage music fans. About that time his film career was also starting in earnest, and after appearances in a few small films, he struck box-office gold with a lead role in Anchors Aweigh (1945) with Gene Kelly, a Best Picture nominee at the 1946 Academy Awards. Sinatra was awarded a special Oscar for his part in a short film that spoke out against intolerance, The House I Live In (1945). His career on a high, Sinatra went from strength to strength on record, stage and screen, peaking in 1949, once again with Gene Kelly, in the MGM musical On the Town (1949) and Take Me Out to the Ball Game (1949). A controversial public affair with screen siren Ava Gardner broke up his marriage to Nancy Barbato and did his career little good, and his record sales dwindled. He continued to act, although in lesser films such as Meet Danny Wilson (1951), and a vocal cord hemorrhage all but ended his career. He fought back, though, finally securing a role he desperately wanted--Maggio in From Here to Eternity (1953). He won an Oscar for best supporting actor and followed this with a scintillating performance as a cold-blooded assassin hired to kill the US President in Suddenly (1954). Arguably a career-best performance--garnering him an Academy Award nomination for Best Actor--was his role as a pathetic heroin addict in the powerful drama The Man with the Golden Arm (1955).

Known as "One-Take Charlie" for his approach to acting that strove for spontaneity and energy, rather than perfection, Sinatra was an instinctive actor who was best at playing parts that mirrored his own personality. He continued to give strong and memorable performances in such films as Guys and Dolls (1955), The Joker Is Wild (1957) and Some Came Running (1958). In the late 1950s and 1960s Sinatra became somewhat prolific as a producer, turning out such films as A Hole in the Head (1959), Sergeants 3 (1962) and the very successful Robin and the 7 Hoods (1964). Lighter roles alongside "Rat Pack" buddies Dean Martin and Sammy Davis Jr. were lucrative, especially the famed Ocean's Eleven (1960). On the other hand, he alternated such projects with much more serious offerings, such as The Manchurian Candidate (1962), regarded by many critics as Sinatra's finest picture. He made his directorial debut with the World War II picture None But the Brave (1965), which was the first Japanese/American co-production. That same year Von Ryan's Express (1965) was a box office sensation. In 1967 Sinatra returned to familiar territory in Sidney J. Furie's The Naked Runner (1967), once again playing as assassin in his only film to be shot in the U.K. and Germany. That same year he starred as a private investigator in Tony Rome (1967), a role he reprised in the sequel, Lady in Cement (1968). He also starred with Lee Remick in The Detective (1968), a film daring for its time with its theme of murders involving rich and powerful homosexual men, and it was a major box-office success.

After appearing in the poorly received comic western Dirty Dingus Magee (1970), Sinatra didn't act again for seven years, returning with a made-for-TV cops-and-mob-guys thriller Contract on Cherry Street (1977) (TV), which he also produced. Based on the novel by William Rosenberg, this fable of fed-up cops turning vigilante against the mob boasted a stellar cast and was a ratings success. Sinatra returned to the big screen in The First Deadly Sin (1980), once again playing a New York detective, in a moving and understated performance that was a fitting coda to his career as a leading man. He made one more appearance on the big screen with a cameo in Cannonball Run II (1984) and a final acting performance in "Magnum, P.I." (1980) in 1987 as a retired detective seeking vengeance on the killers of his granddaughter in an episode entitled "Laura".

MORE INFO ON FAYE DUNAWAY: Faye Dunaway was born on a farm in Bascom, Florida in 1941, the daughter of an army officer and a housewife. After high school she majored in education at the University of Florida, but switched to theatre arts and transferred to Boston University, earning her degree in 1962. She joined the American National Theatre and Academy in 1961 and did four plays on Broadway over the next three years. Her first screen appearance was on the short-lived TV drama series "Seaway" (1965) in 1965. Two years later, she skyrocketed to fame as Bonnie Parker in the pop culture juggernaut Bonnie and Clyde (1967), for which she earned her first Academy Award nomination. From then on she was in demand everywhere, holding her own against Steve McQueen in The Thomas Crown Affair (1968), Jack Nicholson in Chinatown (1974), and Robert Redford in Three Days of the Condor (1975). Her 1976 Oscar win for Network (1976) represented the high water mark of her career. Things only went downhill from there, and her controversial portrayal of Joan Crawford in Mommie Dearest (1981) marked the end of her reign as a top tier actress, bewildering many fans who found her performance to be astonishing. A late career highlight came in 1987 with the critically acclaimed Barfly (1987), but it was not an effective comeback for her. She continues to act, more prolifically than in her heyday, though primarily in obscure low-budget films.

MORE INFO ON BRENDA VACCARO: MORE INFO ON BRENDA VACCARO:

Brenda Buell Vaccaro (born November 18, 1939) is an American stage, television, and film actress.

Vaccaro was born in Brooklyn, New York, to Italian American parents Christine M. (née Pavia) and Mario A. Vaccaro (originally a lawyer), both of whom were pioneers in Italian cuisine. She was raised in Texas, where her parents co-founded Mario's Restaurant (a nationally recognized restaurant) and where Vaccaro graduated from Thomas Jefferson High School in Dallas in 1958. She returned to New York City to study at the Neighborhood Playhouse, and made her Broadway debut in the short-lived 1961 comedy Everybody Loves Opal, for which she won the Theatre World Award.

Vaccaro's Broadway credits include The Affair (1962), Cactus Flower (1965), How Now, Dow Jones (1967), The Goodbye People (1968), the female version of The Odd Couple, (1985), and Jake's Women (1992).[6] The husky-voiced actress is a three-time Tony Award nominee, for Best Featured Actress in a Play (Cactus Flower), Best Actress in a Musical (Dow Jones), and Best Actress in a Play (The Goodbye People). Vaccaro appeared with Dustin Hoffman and Jon Voight in the 1969 film Midnight Cowboy, for which she was nominated for a Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress. For her performance in the 1975 film adaptation of Jacqueline Susann's Once Is Not Enough she gained an Academy Award nomination and won the Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actress. Additional screen credits include Airport '77, Capricorn One, The Pride of Jesse Hallam, Supergirl, The Mirror Has Two Faces, Heart of Midnight, Zorro: The Gay Blade and House by the Lake, also known as Death Weekend.

Vaccaro's television credits include the title role in the 1976 series Sara, a number of television movies, and a regular role in the short-lived 1984 series Paper Dolls, in addition to guest appearances on Banacek, The Fugitive, The Defenders, Coronet Blue, The Name of the Game, Marcus Welby, M.D., McCloud, The Streets of San Francisco, The Love Boat, St. Elsewhere, Murder, She Wrote, The Golden Girls, Columbo, Touched by an Angel, Friends, The King of Queens, and Nip/Tuck. She has been nominated for an Emmy Award three times and won for Best Supporting Actress in Comedy-Variety, Variety or Music for The Shape of Things in 1974. She also starred in a series of commercials for Playtex deodorant and regular tampons.

She supplied the voice for Johnny Bravo's mother Bunny Bravo in the animated cartoon series. She also made an appearance on The Smurfs as Scruple, an apprentice of Gargamel, opposite Paul Winchell.

It is part of our in-store inventory from our shop which is located in the heart of Hollywood where we have been in business for the past 40 years

FIRST DEADLY SIN Original Studio COPY Script FRANK SINATRA
Item #BMM0000693