$19.99


This is an ORIGINAL signed AUTOGRAPH Typed Letter. Great for the GAME SHOW NETWORK GSN fan!

This is a signed letter from Game Show Mogul and producer,

MIKE STOKEY

This letter is dated August 27, 1969. It was to Don Gray in regard to some contractor work.

He signed it in a green pen. Top letterhead says MIKE STOKEY ENTERPRISES INC. Bottom says STUMP THE STARS.

It's a great signature for the obscure autograph collector or game show fan!Shop with confidence! This is part of our in-store inventory from our shop which is has been located in the heart of Hollywood where we have been in business for OVER 40 years!

MORE INFO ON MIKE STOKEY: Mike Stokey (September 14, 1918 September 7, 2003) was an American game show host and producer, best known for Pantomime Quiz and its later incarnation, Stump the Stars. He also produced early TV specials, including A Christmas Carol in 1949, for the Jerry Fairbanks Company. Stokey also hosted Beat the Odds while it was presented at KTLA.

His ex-wife was B-movie actress Pamela Blake, with whom he had one son, Mike Stokey Jr., former USMC Vietnam veteran, whose career as a technical advisor on war movies led to his working with many notable movie giants, including Steven Spielberg. Mike Stokey Jr. recently published a book titled "River of Perfumes", about his experience during the battle of Hue in 1968.

He died from complications from liver disease on September 7, 2003 (seven days before his 85th birthday) in Las Vegas.

MORE INFO ON PANTOMIME QUIZ: Pantomime Quiz was an

American television game show produced and hosted by Mike Stokey. Running from 1947-1959, it has the distinction of being one of the few television series?along with The Arthur Murray Party, Down You Go, and The Original Amateur Hour -- to air on all four TV networks in the US during the Golden Age of Television.

Based on the parlor game of

Charades, Pantomime Quiz was first broadcast locally in Los Angeles from November 13, 1947 to June 30, 1950; In that format, it won an Emmy Award for "Most Popular Television Program" at the first Emmy Awards ceremony. The competition involved two teams of four contestants each (three regulars and one guest). In each round, one member acts out (in mime) a phrase or a name while the other three try to guess it. Each team had five rounds (in some broadcasts there were only four); the team that took the less amount of time to guess all phrases won the game.

Home viewers were encouraged to send in suggestions for phrases to be used in a telecast. Those that were actually used earned cash or a prize for the people who sent them; a bonus was given if the team trying to solve it could not do so within two minutes.

Broadcast history (national)

Pantomime Quiz

was picked up by CBS for a Summer run from July 3 to September 25, 1950 and July 2 to August 20, 1951; After this, NBC took it as a midseason replacement from January 2 to March 26, 1952 then gave it back to CBS from July 4 to September 26. NBC never aired the program again.

After another Summer run from July 10 to August 28, 1953,

DuMont took the series from October 20 to April 13, 1954, after which it bounced back to CBS from July 9 to August 27.

ABC finally took the charades game for a midseason shot much like NBC, airing the durable quiz from January 22 to March 6, 1955. After CBS took it back they, apparently having no thought to place the popular program into the regular season, ran it for three more Summers (July 8 to September 30, 1955; July 6 to September 7, 1956; July 5 to September 6, 1957) before it dropped the program altogether.

After a seven-month absence, ABC picked up Pantomime Quiz from April 8 to September 2, 1958; Finally, on May 18, 1959 the show finally began airing in daytime and concurrently with a nighttime show beginning on June 8.

However, September 28 saw the end of the nighttime version; Eleven days later the daytime version said goodbye on October 9, 1959.

On September 17, 1962 Pantomime Quiz returned to the air as Stump The Stars on

CBS with Pat Harrington, Jr. as the emcee. Stokey replaced Harrington on December 16 and continued as both host and producer until the September 16, 1963 Finale.

Soon after, Stokey began recording a new syndicated version which ran from February 24 to September 2, 1964. It returned five years later (September 8, 1969) as Mike Stokey's Stump the Stars. As the title suggests, Stokey returned once again to host.

Celebrity Charades

Main article:

Celebrity Charades

January 1979 brought another syndicated revival with a few tweaks and a new name - Celebrity Charades.

Jay Johnson was the host; This version aired until September, although the first three episodes reran on GSN in the 1990s.

On June 20, 2005

AMC revived the series, which was presented by Hilary Swank and her husband Chad Lowe. Swank, Lowe, and director Bob Balaban were the producers - although only Lowe hosted. In this version each team had its own room in which to compete. One player from each team is sent to midstage (actually the middle of a New York City loft apartment) to retrieve a phrase to be acted out in his/her team's room. When the team guesses the phrase correctly, the person making correct guess is sent out to midstage for another clue, and so forth until five phrases are guessed. The first team that guesses the phrases' common theme wins the game.

However, this version did even worse than all of the ones before it, running for five episodes until the experiment ended on June 24.

Regular panelists

Some of the "stars" who were regularly "stumped" on Pantomime Quiz or Stump the Stars:

Carol Burnett

Sebastian Cabot

Robert Clary

Jan Clayton

Hans Conried

Jackie Coogan

Peter Donald

Diana Dors

Beverly Garland

Rocky Graziano

Dorothy Hart

Adele Jurgens

Stubby Kaye

Milt Kamen

Richard Long

Ross Martin

Vincent Price

Elaine Stritch

Dick Van Dyke

Lucie Arnaz

MORE INFO ON MIKE STOKEY: Mike Stokey (September 14, 1918 ? September 7, 2003) was an American

game show host and producer, best known for Pantomime Quiz and its later incarnation, Stump the Stars. He also produced early TV specials, including A Christmas Carol in 1949, for the Jerry Fairbanks Company. His ex-wife was B-movie actress Pamela Blake, with whom he had one son, Mike Stokey Jr., whose career as a technical advisor on war movies led to his working with many notable movie giants, including Steven Spielberg. Both Pantomime Quiz and Stump The Stars episodes can still be seen on TV4U.Com.

It is part of our in-store inventory from our shop which is located in the heart of Hollywood where we have been in business for the past 40 years

MIKE STOKEY Original Signed AUTOGRAPH Letter STUMP THE STAR
Item #BMM0000673